SUBJECT INDEX

======================================

Harvey Sacks

Lectures on Conversation

Vol. I & II

(1992)

======================================

Compiled by Gail Jefferson

{Edited by Gene Lerner}

A

Abraham the Hebrew (2) [See Biblical Materials and Issues]

Absence (22)

Academia (16)

Accountables, Accounts, Explanations, etc. (31)

Activity-Occupied Phenomena (1)

Adjacency, Adjacency Pairs (8)

Advice [see Warnings, Advice, Threats, etc.]

Affiliation (7) [see also Agreement]

Aggregate Data [See Collection]

Agreement (8)

Alternatives (49)

Ambiguity (15)

Announcements (1)

‘Anonymous’ Interaction (23)

Answers [See “Questions & Answers”]

Appearance (5)

Argument (9)

Assembling Activities (5)

Assessments (4)

Azande Oracle (1)

B

Base Environment (2)

Believing, Believability, Reliability (5)

Biblical Materials, Issues (10)

Biology (2)

C

Case-by-Case Procedure (4)

Categories and Classes, Categorizing (95)

Causality / Chance (6)

Ceremonials (4)

Children (35)

Claiming vs. Demonstrating (3)

Closings (11)

Coincidence  (2)

Collaborative Utterances (9)

Collections: Working with, Arguing via, etc. (71)

Commitment (12)

Comparison / Equivalence (10)

Complaints (13)

Completion (24)

Compliments (8)

Context (2)

Contrast (9)

Conveying Information (1) [see also Getting Something Done]

Correction [see Repair]

Correction-Invitation Device (2)

Correctness / Truth (32)

Counting (5)

Couples-talk (5)

D

Description (20)

Directedness of an Utterance (13)

Dreams (1)

E

Eating Together (3)

Emblems (2)

Entitlement (4)

Erasability (2)

Error (14)

Etiquette (8)

Evidence (2)

Ex-Relationals’ (1)

Exemplary Occurrences (1)

Explanations [see Accountables, Accounts, Explanations, etc.]

F

“Face-to-Face” Materials, Observations, etc. (10)

Fitted Talk (10)

Foreshortened / Expanded Sequences (1)

Formulation (26)

Freedom of Occurrence (7)

G

Games / Play (18)

Getting Something Done Without ‘Doing’ It (13)

Glancing (2)

Gossip (5)

Greetings (11)

Groups (9)

H

Happenstance vs. Systematic (6)

Hell as a Mnemonic Technique (2)

Helping (1)

Hinting (5)

I

Identification (29) [see also ‘Categories & Classes’]

Ideology (3)

Idioms, Tokens, etc. (7)

Images (18)

Imitation (5)

Importance, Interestingness, etc. (27)

Incongruity (1)

Indexical Expressions (27)

Indirect Actions [See ‘Getting something done without doing it’]

Inference (2)

Informants (1)

Information: Packaging and Transmission (9)

Innocence [See Playing Dumb]

Institutional Use of Ordinary Devices (3)

Insults (7)

Interruption [See ‘Turn-taking’]

Intimacy (13)

Intonation (10)

Introductions (4)

Invitations (11)

J

Job’s Problem (3) [See Biblical Materials and Issues]

Jokes (12)

K

Knowledge (18)

L

Laughing (9)

Lay-Professional / Lay-Scientific, etc. (19)

Lies, Lying (12)

Linguistics (5) [See also Social Sciences]

Lists, Listing (15)

Literature (8)

Localizing the World (21)

Logic (10)

M

Macro / Micro (15) [See also ‘Importance, Interestingness, etc.’]

Meaning (2)

Measurement (5)

Membership Categorization Device: [See ‘Categories & Class’]

Memory (12)

Minority Groups (22)

M.I.R. Device (2)

Moves (9) [See also Turn-taking, Sequence]

N

Names, No-Naming, etc. (14)

News (5)

Normal, Standard, Routine, Normative, etc. (29)

Norms (16)

O

Obligations [see Rights and Obligations]

Observability – Observables, etc. (19) [See also Recognizability]

Offers (1)

“On the Way Home” = ‘The Story is about to Come’ (1)

Opinion  (1)

Overall Structural Organization (1)

P

Pacing (9)

Pairing Off (1)

Pairs (21)

Paradox (4)

Paranoia (3)

Paraphrasing (5)

Pause [See ‘Silence/Pause’]

Performatives (4)

Philosophy (5)

Phoney (4)

Placement, Positioning (46)

Playing Dumb, Feigning  Innocence (3)

Poetics of Ordinary Talk (14)

Poetry (8)

Politeness (1)

Possessables & Possessitives (2)

Power (1)

Practical Mysticism (1)

Preference (24)

Pre-Sequences (5)

Preservable Features of an Interaction for Another Interaction (6)

Private Calendars (3)

Programmatic Relevance (5)

Pronouns [See ‘Indexical Expressions’]

Proverbs (8)

Psychiatric Issues, Materials, etc. (39)

Puns (3)

Q

Questions, Answers, Q-A (51)

R

Reason-for-a-Call (7)

Recasting a Prior Action (2)

Recipient Design (14)

Recognizability (19) [Also see Observability]

Recurrence [See Collections, Working with, Arguing via]

Reference (9)

Relevance (42)

Repair (17)

Repeats, Repeat Requests, etc. (11)

Representative(ness) (4)

Reproducibility (2)

Requests (8)

Rights and Obligations (22)

Roles (3)

Rounds (4)

Rules, Procedures, Constrains, etc. (62)

S

Sampling (4)

Search For Help (2)

Second Speakership (6)

Sentences (19)

Sequence (46) [Also see ‘Sequencing’ & ‘Turn-taking’]

Sequencing (28)  [Also see ‘Placement’; ‘Sequence’; ‘Turn-taking’; ‘Tying Rules’]

Setting (3)

Signaling (14)

Silence/Pause (14)

Simplicity / Complexity (6)

Singular Events, Single-Case Analysis, etc. (9)

Slots (7)

Social Sciences – Reference to, Comments on, etc. (66)

Socialization (8)

‘Standardization’ [See Normal, Standards, Routines, etc.]

Statistics (14)

Status (4)

Stories, Storytelling (39)

Subjectivity/Objectivity (6)

Subversion (8)

Suicide (7)

Symbols (1)

T

Telephone as a New Institution (3)

 Tellability (6)

Thankables (5)

The [X]” as Claiming Possession (1)

Thinking (24)

Tickets (6)

Topic (36)

Trash Mail (1)

Troubles (14)

Turn-Taking (42) [See also, ‘Sequence’ & ‘Sequencing’]

Tying “Rules” / “Structures” / “Techniques” (15)

U

Uh” (5)

Uh huh”, et al. (12)

Understanding (10)

Utterances (16)

V

Verbs (3)

Violations (16)

Voice Recognition Tests (2)

W

Warnings, Advice, Threats, Challenges, etc. (9)

Warrants, Good Grounds, etc. (18)

Why?” (6)

Word Searches (6)

Back to Top

Absence

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 7

(Non-absence) of a name

Lecture 2

pp. 18-19

Of ceremonials

Lecture 5

p. 38

Of membership in a unit

Lecture 8

p. 60

M.I.R. categories & a notion of ‘absence’

Lecture 11

p. 88

Located via ‘order of relevance’

“Let's talk about there being, for some collection of classes, an ' order of relevancy' with respect to categories. It seems that a set of circumstances can provide that order of relevancy for some membership class.”

Lecture 12

p. 97

Of greetings

F ’65

Lecture 10

p. 190

Of ‘getting caught’

S ’66

Lecture 2 (R)

pp. 261-262

Of greetings

Lecture 04b

pp. 293-295

Via ‘rounds’

Lecture 5

p. 308

Via ‘invariably relevant’ items

Lecture 29

p. 464

Via a set of categories

Appendix A

pp. 493-495

Vis-à-vis children’s games

S ’67

Lecture 11

p. 575

“I don’t do X”

F ’67

Lecture 6

pp. 670-671

Via utterance pairs

S ’68

May 8

pp. 782-783

People’s orientation to what they’re missing…via absence of something to say

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 3

pp. 35-36

Greetings vis-à-vis ‘noticeable absence’

Lecture 5

p. 62

Greetings vis-à-vis ‘noticeable absence’

Lecture 6

p. 67

Introductions can be ‘notably absent’

S ’70

Lecture 6

pp. 267-268

Discriminativeness necessary in reporting ‘what I didn’t do’.

W ’71

March 4

p. 315

“After 25 years” of what?

S ’71

April 19

p. 364

Lifting ‘transition relevance’; on somebody’s completion nobody talks and talk is not ‘absent’

April 23

p. 368

Invitation to come over and ‘talk’ provides for an absence (at least ‘dinner’)

Academia

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 4

pp. 29-30

Lecture 10

p. 83

Lecture 13

p. 105

S ’67

Lecture 9

p. 558

Lecture 12

pp. 582-583

F ’67

Introduction

p. 620

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 5

Lecture 2

p. 17

W ’69

Lecture 3

p. 112

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 187

S ’70

Lecture 7

p. 282

S ’71

April 2

pp. 335-337

F ’71

Lecture 1

p. 419

Lecture 15

p. 507

S ’72

Lecture 3

pp. 549-550

Lecture 5

p. 561

Re. prefaces as independent of what they precede.

Accountables, Accounts, Explanations, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 4

Accountable actions

Lecture 2

pp. 19-20

Accountable actions

Lecture 3

pp. 21-23

pp. 22-23

pp. 23-25

Getting an account via correction-invitation device

Classes of accounts

A3N  = “Account apparently appropriate, negativer”

Lecture 5

p. 32

p. 37

 

Lecture 10

pp. 72-77

Accountable actions

Lecture 12

p. 101

The problem of  ‘giving an account for silence’

Lecture 14

pp. 121-124

Among “competing facts”, the one with an explanation did occur.

 

F ’65

Lecture 8

p. 180

 

Lecture 10

pp. 190-191

 

Lecture 11

p. 195

Explaining away an asserted rule

Lecture 14

p. 208

 

 

S ’66

Lecture 8

pp. 337-340

“Stereotyped” statements as ‘explanations’

Lecture 12

pp. 355-356

An explanation is the explanation; layers of accounts

Lecture 15

pp. 380-381

Correction-invitation: a ‘possibly good account’

Lecture 20

pp. 412-413

An explanation is the explanation

Lecture 21

pp. 425-426

Explanation of another’s position via some membership category

Lecture 27

p. 453

In therapy, routinely usable explanations can be “just about irrelevant”

Lecture 28

pp. 457-459

‘Causally efficacious’ categories (usable to formulate explanations)

Lecture 32

p. 480

‘How they got it’ explanation of imitation

Lecture 33

p. 487

What would a scientific account look like?

W ’67

March 9

pp. 538, 542

pp. 545-546

Why say that now? Accounted for by talk to raised topics

Why say that? Why now? Accounted for by its having been understood.

 

S ’67

Lecture 13

pp. 588-589

Category-bound action & its category explain why something happened: they do that.

 

F ’67

Lecture 9

p. 700

Rejecting the fact via rejecting the explanation: UFOs, the Dobu

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 94-95

“This place costs too much money” to explain hole in shoe.

 

W ’70

Lecture 4

p. 195

Public vs. private accounts of sadness at a tragedy

 

S ’70

Lecture 6

pp. 263-266

Delicate relationship between problem and explanation (blind lady – Brad Crandall)

 

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 530

Why say this now?  Accounted for via adjacency pair sequencing

Activity-Occupied Phenomena

Volume I

W ’67

March 9

p. 543

“I did”

Adjacency, Adjacency Pairs

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 4

p. 150

“Consecutive” utterances

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 3

p. 43

“Adjacency relationship between utterances”

Lecture 4

p. 47

Placement and “adjacency relationship”

Lecture 5

p. 62

“Adjacency placing”… “ ‘utterance pairs’ ”

W ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 189-190

‘Greetings’ as “adjacency pairs”

S ’71

Lecture 1

pp. 521-532

Adjacency pairs: Scope of operation

Lecture 2

pp. 533-537

Distribution rule for adjacency pairs

S ’72

Lecture 4

pp. 554-560

The relating power of adjacency

Affiliation (see also Agreement)

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 12

p. 101

Jokes as ‘unaffiliated’

F ’65

Lecture 3

p. 148

Re. “We”

Lecture 11

pp. 193, 195

Re. A maxim or rule

Lecture 14

p. 206

As ‘military man’

S ’66

Lecture 16

p. 383

“My” in its ‘affiliative’ use

Lecture 21

p. 421

“We’ve told you that”

S ’67

Lecture 16

pp. 605-606

“My” in its ‘affiliative’ use

Aggregate data (see ‘Collection’)

Agreement

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 3

p. 147

S ’66

Lecture 21

p. 426

Lecture 23

pp. 428, 430-434

F ’67

Lecture 13

p. 736

“ ‘Well’ signals disagreement”

S ’68

April 14

pp. 770, 771

Of a stock of stories, you remember the one that ‘agreed with the one you were told.

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 2

p. 30

Agreement via “a same story,” disagreement via “a story which has you in a different position”

W ’70

Lecture 4

p. 199

Slaves requiredly agree with masters

S ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 252, 256

Claiming vs. proving agreement

Alternatives

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 14

p. 116

Alternative sets of categories available for any population of persons

F ’65

Lecture 3

p. 149

‘Company’ as a ‘general alternative category’

Lecture 7

p. 171

‘Company’

Lecture 10

p. 192

Alternative strategies: getting away with it vs. tempting enforcers

Lecture 14

pp. 205-206

pp. 214 ff

Alternative categorical formulations

Personal- Impersonal

S ’66

Lecture 2

p. 252

Alternative categories

Lecture 4a

p. 282

Proper alternative sequences

Lecture 4

p. 305

Serious alternatives /  alternation classes

Lecture 5

p. 307

Alternative identifications

Lecture 6

p. 313

Alternative identifications

Lecture 7

p. 326

Alternative identifications

Lecture 11

pp. 348-350

“Alternative meanings for a word”

Lecture 12

p. 354

pp. 358-359

“Systematic differences in sorts of machinery invoked [for] doing warnings”

“Complaining and applauding stand in some strong alternation to each other”

Lecture 17

p. 392

p. 394

Alternative names for the same car

Scope of a set of alternatives

Lecture 18

 

p. 396

Alternative names of cars; teenager / hotrodder

Lecture 20

pp. 415-416

Alternative name of cars

Lecture 24

pp. 435-440

Alternative measuring systems

Lecture 25

 

pp. 441-442

‘Alternation category: ‘company’

Lecture 26

pp. 443-449

Dilemma: either alternative is ‘bad’

Lecture 27

pp. 454

Doctor / patient: stranger / stranger (Freud)

Lecture 31

 

p. 474

Legal-illegal / counts-doesn’t count

Lecture 33

 

p. 486

Macro / micro: Catholicism / Protestantism

Appendix A

pp. 496-497

pp. 501-502

p.504

Vowel / consonant in first words; simple alternating actions in first games

Legal-illegal / counts-doesn’t count

Fantasy-reality theory – practical efficacy

S ’67

Lecture 9

pp. 562

pp. 564-565

‘Doctor’ / ‘just a somebody’

Consequences of alternative answers

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 679

More alternativeness vs. oriented-to contrast-class

Lecture 14

 

pp. 740-742

Alternative temporal references

S ’68

April 17

p. 753

Characterizations of persons...are in principle selections from alternatives.

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

p. 73

Alternative formulations of a topic

W ’69

Lecture 2

pp. 98-99

pp. 114-115, 123

‘Save’ vs. ‘unsafe’ compliments / ‘female’ vs. ‘male’

Alternative sequences

Lecture 7

p. 117

“Why did you do X?” vs. “Why the hell did you do X?”

Lecture 8

pp. 133-136

Abstract vs. concrete talk

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 183

‘Precise’ vs. ‘approximate’ Temporal references

Lecture 4

p. 195

Public vs. private accounts of sadness at a tragedy

W ’71

March 4

p. 309

Alternative formulations for expressing position on reported event (“he had to go” vs. “he said he had to go”)

S ’71

April 30

pp. 378

Alternative name-types

May 21

pp. 404-405

p. 407

Alternative formulations of a person (“he,” “Mr. Jones,” “her husband”)

‘Stranger’ as an alternative formulation

F ’71

Lecture 5

pp. 447-448

“…some identities, both of which are correct, can stand in an alternation relationship to each other.”

Lecture 6

pp. 455-456

‘We were going to [do X] but [A&B], so we [did Y]?’ “Question: Why put I a rejected alternative?” Re. proposing ‘normalness and variance’

Lecture 14

 

pp. 500-502

Wanted vs. unwanted possible Christmas gifts “I didn’t want an [X], I want a [Y] or a [Z].”

S ’72

Lecture 2

p. 538

“The oldest one in the class” does not have as its set of alternatives the “obvious semantic” set; i.e. positions of age.  Rather, e.g., “Are you the only black executive at [X] company?” (Methodological consideration here)

Lecture 3

p. 547

Alternative types of answers

Ambiguity

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 6

pp. 165-167

p. 167

‘You’ as ‘systematically ambiguous’

in warnings

Lecture 9

p. 186

Who is “the guy”?

Appendix A

p. 225

Stage of life? family? (“baby”)

S ’66

Lecture 1

p. 239

Stage of life? family? (“baby”)

Lecture 1 (R)

p. 247

Stage of life? family? (“baby”)

Lecture 8

p. 335

 “We”

Lecture 11

p. 349

‘You’ as ‘systematically ambiguous’

Lecture 19

pp. 406-407

‘Nice kid’ / ‘hotrodder’

Lecture 20

p. 415

‘Not many people get picked up’

S ’67

Lecture 13

pp. 584-585

‘The baby cried’; the criminal confessed / the Catholic confessed.

F ’67

Lecture 6

pp. 671-672

Sequentialized ambiguity: serious or joke?

Volume II

S ’71

April 26

pp. 373-374

‘You’ as ambiguous

F ’71

Lecture 3

pp. 431-435

Re. obscene puns

Lecture 12

pp. 489-490

Re. sounds of sex

Announcements

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 87-91

‘Anonymous’ Interaction

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 3, 5

Agency / client

Lecture 8

p. 59

And usability of ‘normal’

Lecture 11

p. 92

Adequate for checking out a noticing

Lecture 14

pp. 114, 116

Re. seeing what has happened in a story one has only heard part of. (“Didn’t you smack her one?”)

F ’65

Lecture 9

p. 185

Re. “Didn’t you smack her one.”

S ’66

Lecture 4b

pp. 297-298

Re. organizing greetings & introduction

Lecture 20

p. 414

How “I will be seen by somebody unknown to me personally…”

Lecture 24

p. 438

Between drivers, re. “How do you drive?”

Lecture 32

p. 481

Seeing someone ‘imitating’

Lecture 33

p. 485

General statement

Appendix A

p. 492

pp. 504-505

In children’s games

Across cultures (games)

S ’67

Lecture 8

pp. 555, 556

Vis-à-vis “How are you?”

Lecture 9

pp. 558, 559, 560

Vis-à-vis “How are you?”

Lecture 12

p. 580

Controlling impressions for whomsoever

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 95-96

Taxes as anybody’s complaint

W ’70

Lecture 4

p. 191

pp. 194-195

p. 197

Greetings routinely done by people who are otherwise unacquainted

Making one’s mind available to anonymous persons who encounter you

Caring what anonymous people think of you

S ’70

Lecture 1

p. 221

Pedestrian-driver communication

Lecture 4

p. 248

You should tell your friends a story in the same way “anybody should tell it to anybody”

Lecture 7

pp.  280-281

“The rules of conversation are designed for anonymous parties”

Lecture 15

pp. 510-511

Utterly conventional characterization in telling of an “intimate” problem: “there’s a way in which the story is about nobody in particular.”

Answers [See “Questions & Answers”]

Appearance

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 2

p. 20

Re. Job’s Problem

Lecture 14

pp. 120-121

Raymond [One Boy’s Day] and Adam

F ’65

Lecture 7

p. 173

Being seen as, e.g., ‘a hotrodder’

S ’66

Lecture 13

pp. 363-366, 369

pp. 404-409

Useability of, to create a false appearance (Button-Button)

‘Appearance verbs’

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

pp. 79-80

Arranging to be seen in a “characteristic appearance”

 

Argument

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 8

pp. 179-181

Argument name-calling

Lecture 14

p. 207

The ‘unclean hands’ argument, etc.

S ’66

Lecture 10

pp. 344-346

Position markers “I still say though…”

S ’67

Lecture 17

p. 614

 Position markers “I still say though…”

F ’67

Lecture 10

pp. 707-708

Communist vs. Republican / ‘people like us’ vs. ‘people like us’.

Lecture 13

pp. 736-737

Locational marker “I still say though…”

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 49

Violation Argument

S ’71

April 5

pp. 344-347

Argument re. whether New Pike is “depressing” or not.

F ’71

Lecture 3

p. 433

It’s a characteristically known thing that talk on any topic can “end up in an argument”

Assembling Activities

Volume I

F ’64-     S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 10-11

Lecture 4

pp. 27, 30

Lecture 11

p. 89

(and ‘decomposing’)

Lecture 13

p. 112

(assembling potential description)

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 169

Assessments

Volume I

F ’64-     S ’65

Lecture 9

pp. 66-69

F ’65

Lecture 14

p. 206

S ’68

May 29

p. 800

Volume II

S ’71

May 3

pp. 384-390

Person’s technique for assessing possible correctness of offered solutions to their problems.

Azande Oracle

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 34-35

Base Environment

 

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 8-9

Volume II

S ’71

April 30

p. 380

(Same phenomena as ‘base environment’ but not so referred to)

Believing, Believability, Reliability

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 8

pp. 62-64

Cry Wolf, missiles, etc.

Volume II

W ’71

March 4

pp. 309-310

Exhibiting the believability or not of another’s reported talk (e.g. “he had to go” vs. “he said he had to go”)

F ’71

Lecture 7

pp. 462

“He said he went to acting school with Kirk Douglas.  And I believe him.” (Here, he pre-positions “Nice looking guy” - cf. e.g. W ’70 Lecture 7 pp. 274-276 Re. pre-positioned characterizations, etc.)

Lecture 10

pp. 479, 481

‘Suspension of disbelief’

Lecture 16

pp. 516-517

“How do you believe your brain?” (cat dream)

Biblical Materials, Issues

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 2

p. 20

Job’s Problem

Lecture 4

p. 28

Bible study as a model

Lecture 14

p. 118

p. 121

Job’s Problem

Adam

F ’65

Lecture 7

p. 171

Abraham the Hebrew

S ’66

Lecture 18

pp. 396-397

Abraham the Hebrew

Lecture 20

p. 412

Job’s Problem

Lecture 23

pp. 430-431

Ten Commandments / Hittite vassalage agreements

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 51

“That it may go well with thee…”

S ’70

Lecture 1

p. 220

Lot’s Warning Re. Sodom & Gomorrah

Biology

Volume I

F ’64-S ’65

Lecture 4

p. 27 ff

Lecture 12

pp. 98-9

Case-by-Case Procedure

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 8

p. 62

(Dealing with ‘odd’ suicides)

Lecture 10

p. 78

(Kids testing Class I [causal] rules / Class II [normative] rules)

Lecture 11

p. 89

(“A stream of odd ones”)

F ’65

Lecture 11

pp. 196-197

(Dealing with possible suicides)

Categories and Classes, Categorizing

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 6

pp. 40-48

p. 45

M.I.R.

‘Categorizing the categorizer’

Lecture 8

pp. 58-59

p. 60

p. 64

“Normal”

M.I.R.

And ‘reliability’

Lecture 9

pp. 68-71

M.I.R. ; ‘imitation’

Lecture 11

pp. 86-87

p. 88

M.I.R. “classes & their categories permit you to see”

A categorizing B, gets a sense of C. (cf. Lecture 6 above, p. 45:             ‘Categorizing the categorizer’ and Schegloff’s Introduction, p. xxxiv)

Lecture 14

pp. 116-117

Inference = (among other things), categorizing an event one has not seen.

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 148-149

p. 149

‘We’ can refer to a category

‘Company’ as a ‘general alternation category’

Lecture 7

pp. 170-172

‘Company’

Lecture 8

pp. 179-181

Category-bound activities

Lecture 9

pp. 183-185

p. 186

‘Character appears on cue’

Category-bound activities

Lecture 11

p. 195

Category assigned to a position being esposed

Lecture 12

p. 201

‘Returning spirits…’ as a category for handling strangers

Lecture 14

p. 205 ff

Alternative categorical formulation

Appendix A

p. 225 ff

p. 228

Categorical use of “the mommy”

S ’66

Lecture 1

p. 238 ff

pp. 241-242

‘Membership categorization device’

Category-bound activities

Lecture 1 (R)

p. 246 ff

pp. 248-250

Membership categorization device

Category-bound activities

Lecture 2

pp. 252-254

Category-bound activities

Lecture 2 (R)

pp. 259-261

Category-bound activities

Lecture 04.b

pp. 298-299

Locating appropriate set of categories

Lecture 4

pp. 301-302

Category-bound activities / identification

Lecture 5

p. 306

Vis-à-vis identification

Lecture 6

p. 313

pp. 314-315

pp. 317-319

Vis-à-vis identification

Vis-à-vis omni-relevant devices

Vis-à-vis ‘cover identifications’

Lecture 7

pp. 326-327

Vis-à-vis identification; relational pair

Lecture 8

pp. 334-340

pp. 336-340

‘Membership categorization device”

Category-bound activities

Lecture 10

pp. 346-347

‘Positioned’ categories

Lecture 13

pp. 367-368

Categories aren’t persons; ‘family’ device

Lecture 18

pp. 396-403

‘Hotrodders’ as a revolutionary category

Lecture 19

pp. 406-407

pp. 408-409

‘Nice kid’

If you look like someone who does X, then what you’re doing is X.

Lecture 21

pp. 417-418

pp. 425-426

Vis-à-vis identification

Position in an argument as category-bound

Lecture 25

pp. 441-442

Alternative category: ‘company’

Lecture 26

pp. 444-449

Cops, teachers, etc.: “a special class of people” vis-à-vis teenagers; for “giving lip back”

Lecture 27

p. 454-455

Doctor / patient vs. stranger / stranger (in Freud)

Lecture 28

p. 457

p. 459

‘Causally efficacious’ categories (usable to formulate explanations)

Re. social sciences using Members’ devices to formulate its accounts

(cf. Lecture 04b. pp. 295, 299)

Lecture 29

pp. 464-466

Male-female (safe compliments)

Lecture 30

pp. 467-469

Selection problem for social scientists

Lecture 32

pp. 480-481

Inverse to category-bound activities (imitation).

Appendix A

pp. 490-499

pp. 502-503

Members categorization devices in children’s games

Categories in children’s games

W ’67

February 16

p. 515

Omni-relevant device, patient-therapist

March 2

p. 532

Invokability of ‘patient-therapist’

S ’67

Lecture 8

p. 550

p. 552

p. 553

pp. 555-556

Category-bound ‘correctness’

Class: ‘proper conversationalists’

Class: ‘non-proper conversationalists’

Classes: Personal States and Value States

Lecture 9

p. 562

‘Doctor’ vs. ‘just a somebody’

Lecture 11

p. 577

‘Stereotypes’ as valuable

Lecture 12

pp. 582-583

Critique of ‘category-bound activities’

Lecture 13

pp. 584-588

pp. 585-587

pp. 588-589

Proving that something is a ‘category-bound activity’

‘Positioned’ categories

An important use of ‘category-bound activities’

Lecture 14

pp. 590-594

pp. 594-596

Category ‘partitioning’

‘Omni-relevant’ category collection

Lecture 15.1

pp. 597-600

Category ‘partitioning’

Lecture 15.2

p. 601

‘Category-bound’ topic: automobile discussion

F ’67

Lecture 1

p. 630

Vis-à-vis expressing an opinion

Lecture 011

pp. 712-713

pp. 713-714

Focusing on a relevant identity category via “he”

Categorical vs. personal reference via “we” / “they”

S ’68

April 17

p. 757

Attention to ‘topic’ via co-class membership (e.g. cigars and pipes)

May 29

p. 797

‘Negro woman’ vs. ‘employee’

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 52

Interruption as a case of the class rudeness

Lecture 6

p. 78

“Characteristic” way of doing ‘member’ talk

W ’69

Lecture 2

p. 99

pp. 101-102

p. 103

Set of people by reference to ‘male-female’

Vis-à-vis determining what an action done by A to B is doing to C.

Partitioned categories

Lecture 3

pp. 104-111

p. 110

p. 112

‘Patients / observers’ as ‘performers / audience’

Partitioned categories

Producing “a correct sequence of actions for some set [of categorized terms].”

Lecture 7

pp. 120-121

“Higher ranked person can correct.”

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 182

“‘They’ is in principle a pronoun not for plurals but for categories…”

Lecture 4

pp. 194-197

Stranger-stranger interaction during disaster / tragedy

S ’70

Lecture 5

p. 250

A class: “1st Stories”; a class: “2nd Stories”

W ’71

February 19

pp. 296-298

Host / guest vis-à-vis complainables

S ’71

April 19

pp. 360-366

Caller / Called

May 21

pp. 405-407

Service personnel doing a job vs. “stranger” being “bothered”

F ’71

Lecture 10

p. 482

A “crucially ‘mother-daughter’ interaction”

Lecture 11

p. 490

The ‘mother-daughter’ joke

Lecture 15

p. 510

A ‘rational’ ‘father’ and ‘emotional’ ‘mother’: Adequate characterizations (Verges in categorical-bound activities.)

S ’72

Lecture 2

p. 538

“The oldest one in the class” as a ‘unique position’, akin to “the only (cop, Negro, woman) in the class.”

Lecture 3

pp. 542-553

p. 544

‘Caller-Answer-Called’ etc.

Pone-call ‘answerer’, etc. as “categories and not merely the person they are”

Lecture 5

p. 569

“Whole classes of types of relationships in social structural terms, employers / employees, etc., are characterized by admitting beginnings [of conversation] and no more; specifically not admitting transforms of beginnings into first topics.”

Causality / Chance

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 2

p. 14

‘Causally bound’ relationships

Lecture 5

pp. 34-35

p. 36

Azande vs. us.

Private calendars: ‘causally powerful’

Lecture 10

pp. 77-78

Children and Class I, II rules

Lecture 14

pp. 124-125

 A phenomenon? Or statistical chance? (Miracles, psychic research)

S ’66

Lecture 28

p. 457

‘Causally efficacious’ categories

Ceremonials

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 2

pp. 14-19

pp. 15-16

“How are you?” “Fine”, etc.

Jokes, games, performances

Lecture 7

p. 55

Re. “holding the floor”

Volume II

S ’71

April 26

pp. 370-372, 374

‘An evening together’ as “a ceremony of some sort.”

Children

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 9

p. 70

(and Negroes: imitation)

Lecture 10

pp. 76-77

pp. 78-79

(and infantile adults: “X told me to”)

(and Class I and II rule)

Lecture 11

p. 84

(Unentitled wisdom as ‘error’)

Lecture 12

p. 98

(and a ‘minimal conversation’)

Lecture 13

pp. 111-112

(Learning ‘potential description’)

Lecture 14

pp. 114-115

p. 120

(First lie)

and subversions

F ’65

Lecture 4

pp. 155-156

Children’s speech (‘buildups’)

Lecture 6

p. 167

and Warnings (see Class I, II Rules, pp. 78-79)

Lecture 7

pp. 172-174

‘Teenager’ vs. ‘hot rodder’

Appendix A

p. 226

pp. 227-228

Use of “it”: pronouns available

Use of “the mommy”: family device

Appendix B

p. 230

Restricted rights to talk “You know what?”

S ’66

Lecture 2

pp. 255-258

pp. 256-258

“Competence to lie” / building stories

Restricted rights to talk

Lecture 2 (R)

pp. 263-265

Restricted rights to talk

Lecture 11

p. 348

‘Build-ups’

Lecture 13

pp. 363-369

p. 368

Button-Button

Use of expanded ‘family’ device

Lecture 16

pp. 386-387

Kid recognizing a ‘possessitive’

Lecture 18

pp. 398-399

Children’s culture

Lecture 30

p. 472

Children’s vocabularies

Lecture 31

pp. 473-478

p. 474

 Games: legal / illegal

Children’s memory for correct speech

S ’67

Lecture 9

p. 565

When children begin systematically to lie

Lecture 13

p. 588

Kids learn ‘programmatic relevance’ early

Lecture 14

p. 591

Preparing for ‘adult roles’

F ’67

Lecture 1

p. 629

Two children of the British autocracy

Lecture 7

p. 680

Kids’ play with language involves specific attention to ‘the formal features of a language’.

Lecture 8

p. 689

Children “rather well attuned to the pre-sequence phenomena.”

Lecture 14

p. 739

Young child doing paraphrasing.

S ’68

April 17

p. 760

Children have strong place-memory

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 12

pp. 489-490

pp. 490-492

Children’s puzzlement re. sounds of sex

Children’s encounters with scope of application of rules.

Claiming vs. Demonstrating

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 146-147

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 252, 260

F ’71

Lecture 3

p. 436

Closings

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 12

p. 96

No generic way to close a conversation

F ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 160-161

Closing an insult sequence (“Face the music”)

S ’66

Lecture 2

pp. 255-256

A story close / built as an ending

Lecture 2 (R)

p. 263

A story close / proper ending

Lecture 21

pp. 420-421

Withdrawing from an insult sequence (“Face the Music”)

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 678-679

Closing an insult sequence with “Thank you”

S ’68

May 8

p. 778

Closing a call with reintroduced reason for call / Relationship between beginnings and closings.

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

p. 88

Closing is collaboratively done and takes a sequence

S ’71

April 19

pp. 363-366

“It’s caller’s business to find a place to stick in a possible closing.”

May 21

pp. 402-403

SPC:NYE call closing

S ’72

Lecture 3

p. 552

“Calleds are ‘forced’ off the phone: ‘I’ve got to go do something,’ Callers ‘offer’ to get off the phone: ‘I’m holding up your line’…that…suggests that it is Caller’s business to get off the phone first, Calleds doing it in extremis.”

Coincidence

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 3

pp. 238-240

F ’71

Lecture 10

pp. 478-479

Collaborative Utterances

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 144-147

Lecture 6

p. 167

S ’66

Lecture 7

pp. 321-323

Lecture 15

p. 379

Lecture 21

p. 421

W ’67

March 2

pp. 528-529

F ’67

Lecture 4

pp. 651-655

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 5

pp. 57-60

Lecture 6

pp. 71, 82-83

Collections: Working with, Arguing via, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 3

p. 9

p. 11

“I have a large collection of these conversations”

“In my materials, again and again [X occurs].”

“We’re talking about objects that can be found elsewhere

Lecture 2

p. 13

p. 14

p. 15

p. 16

p. 17

p. 19

p. 20

“Recurrently in these conversations [X occurs].  And…I have things from police reports where [X occurs].

“Persons who [do X] talk about themselves routinely as [Y].”

“Routinely if you look at [X conversations] they begin like [Y].

“I came across a very frequently recurring kind of statement.”

“A recurrent thing I’ve seen throughout their stuff is…”

“One of the things reported about persons who [do X] is [Y].

“Most people, when [X occurs], will say [Y].”

Lecture 3

p. 23

p. 25

“These things are not only recurrent, but…they do work...”

“Again and again we find that [X occurs].”

Lecture 4

p. 29

[The more material you have at your command, the more you ought to be able to…see…recurrence.  But the way to proceed is item by item.”

Lecture 5

p. 36

“I came across [X] several times in the telephone conversation I’ve been analyzing.”

Lecture 6

p. 45

“There is…a whole large bunch of [X statements].”

Lecture 7

p. 49

60 first lines of ‘pickups’; “more than 50 were questions.”

Lecture 8

p. 57

p. 64

“Recurrently in these conversations [X occurs]”

“Maybe it just happened that time.  Not so. Recurrently [X occurs].”

Lecture 9

p. 66

“Suicidal persons recurrently say [X].”

Lecture 11

p. 94

(Re.  “basic assumption, which could have been wrong”: “But…I know that people can do this, I’ve watched it many times...[But] it could have been the case that everybody came back and said, ‘No, I never saw that happen.  And that’s possible.  It might be something that’s dying out.  A thing our forefathers had.  Like God.”

Lecture 12

p. 102

“I got 60 first lines [of ‘pickups’], of which just under 60 were questions.  What I had wanted to be saying [to the class], and which they could see once they had these collections, was…”

Lecture 13

p. 105

“Homans’ procedure for starting a book is one of the most recurrent you’ll find”

Lecture 14

pp. 121-124

4 cases of a procedure: “It’s absolutely routinely used.”

F ’65

Lecture 6

p. 166

(Re. “you”) “I have a lot of very subtle usages. “Those kinds of uses are recurrent”

Lecture 7

p. 174

(Re. not recognizing moves of a non-member) “That kind of thing is very regularly done for all sorts of other things.  “[Volkswagons don’t get waved at].

Lecture 10

p. 192

“…in very different materials on finds the same [phenomenon].”

Lecture 11

p. 195

“We can get lots of examples of [X].”

S ’66

Lecture 2 (R)

p. 263

“Kids around the age of three [do X].”

Lecture 04.a

pp. 283-284

‘Rule detection’ via collection vs. single case

Lecture 5

p. 306

For some assertion, “provide alternative’ independent materials…”

Lecture 12

p. 354

p. 355

p. 359

[X] can be “dug out of such materials as we’ve got (but I take it you’d need a considerable amount to do it)…”

[X] would involve some larger corpus of materials, since [it’s] basically a statistical argument

“…some people do [X] with immense regularity.”

Lecture 21

p. 417

“…we want to ask…whether such activities…occur recurrently in the order they occur in here

Lecture 27

p. 455

“I take it that [X] is quite formulatable and probably very recurrent.”

Lecture 31

p. 473

“And here is another, similar piece of data…

W ’67

March 2

p. 533

“It’s all over the place”…”It’s seeing [various features] and then when you look back to it seeing that it’s all over the place, that I then understand, Alright now, attention has to be paid…[to X].

March 9

p. 540

p. 545

“We would have to check out whether such things are in fact done, so that we could see [that a move in this fragment is indeed] not legitimate, conventional, preferred, etc.”

“Indirect reference” as “the most usual ways to talk.”

S ’67

Lecture 8

p. 549

“In some tape I had, I came across a statement that I’d heard before…”

F ’67

Lecture 4

p. 651

Re. collaborative completions: “[I first thought] it must be quite rare, even though that they do it at all is an extremely important fact.  But it turns out to be an extremely frequent and routinely doable thing.”

Lecture 5

p. 662

“It is typically, routinely, overwhelmingly the case that…”

Lecture 7

p. 682

Floor seekers are “terribly widely used.”

Lecture 11

p. 723

“A very characteristic way to [do X] is [Y].  Here’s some cases.” (3 cases shown)

 

Lecture 12

p. 725

“I won’t quote cases of that sort, but I take it that one can see that it’s so.”

S ’68

May 29

p. 798

Re. letters sent to Governor Brown during Chessman case.  “Something like 40,000 letters, and I’ve read several hundred of them…you get one standard pattern…”

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 5

p. 6

p. 11

p. 13

p. 14

Re. 2nd stories’ intense relationship to 1sts : “What we need to do…is to watch conversations hereafter and see.”

Re. work of 2nd story: “So, for example, in other materials [X occurs].”

“[X] is not at all common, usual, done”

“[X] is an enormously common thing, and to get a sense of it as a usual piece of rhetoric, here’s a yesterday-instance of it.”

“And anybody knows that when somebody [does X they’re telling you [Y].”

 

Lecture 2

pp. 19-20

p. 20

p. 25

p. 25

“If it’s not too easy to see the point with one case, then with another

case you might be able to get a glimpse of a kind of parallel thing going on.

“If you look at stories comparatively…

“Answers are, with some recurrence, not sentences.”

“One might figure that [X is] incidental, so I’ll read another.  If you get two you might feel a little better.  Or you might figure it’s still just chance.”

Lecture 5

p. 59

“When I first found [X] I was absolutely awed…And then [I thought] ‘Does it ever happen?’ And we searched around and found it’s really extremely common”

W ’69

Lecture 9

p. 138

p. 143

“To make [X] argument you need…to have different cases so as to be able to see what is being argued. That’s why I picked two cases…and indeed it was noticing the two cases that set the whole thing up.”

“[X] is the sort of phenomenon that, given one instance you might figure it’s a very rare case, but you could collect a bunch of them in a week.”

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 168-169

“To come to [X notion], we need…a series of other calls in which we could say, establish ‘normal [Y]’…”

Lecture 2

pp. 175-176

“[X phenomena] require a consideration of some collection of [Ys]…”

Lecture 5

p. 208

“And if we find it hard to empathize with the particulars of this conversation, we might imagine other sorts of things…”

S ’70

Lecture 3

p. 230

Having X phenomenon, “one could then collect various other ways that [such things] are done.”

W ’71

February 19

p. 292

“I find an awful lot of [X phenomenon].  And usually, once I find an awful lot of something I wonder if there isn’t something to it, and begin to develop an account of how it would happen.  Finding one, you could just say, Well, I’m being artful in finding it…”

F ’71

Lecture 1

pp. 422-423

Recommendation: “Take an object like proverbial expressions.  Subject them to a distributional investigation to see what’s done with them.”

Lecture 2

p. 429

p. 430

“A common recurrence in a word misuse is [X]…” It happens that I have lots of materials involving these people and it’s a very common thing for [X and Y to occur]

It doesn’t particularly add all that much to these materials that that’s so…”

“A typical kind of incompletion which won’t get completed by someone else: where you’re…going to report on something obscene.”

Lecture 10

p. 481

“Routinely the materials used in a punch line involve [X]…”

Lecture 16

p. 512

“I saw this [datum] and began to puzzle about it by virtue of having had such an experience…it occurred to me that there was good reason to think that it might be an instance of the same thing.”

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 530

“Characteristically stories begin with something that we call a ‘story preface’…[which is] typically a sentence [like X]…”

Lecture 3

p. 543

p. 547

“If you look at [X event], it turns out that this [Y occurrence] is not at all odd.”

“We would want to do an investigation as to whether [X} occurs…with some interesting frequency.”

Commitment

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 5

To an account

Lecture 3

p. 25

To correctness of proverbs

Lecture 9

p. 66

To what the society holds is important or sacred

F ’65

Lecture 7

p. 174

To being a hotrodder

Lecture 10

pp. 193, 194

To rule-makers, enforcers, etc.

S ’66

Lecture 29

pp. 465

To some position / to “the special characteristics of this girl”

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 186-187

To a trust in ‘vision’…what one “simply sees”.

S ’70

Lecture 5

p. 259

To the proper operation of your memory in conversation time

S ’71

April 30

p. 380

p. 380

By suicidal callers, to “this world”

Asking suicidal callers to give their name is asking for a problematic sort of commitment.

F ’71

Lecture 1

p. 420

To the use of observation as a basis for theorizing

Lecture 6

p. 457

To “the normal preferences”

Comparison / Equivalence

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 23

p. 431

Lecture 24

p. 439

Lecture 28

pp. 456-460

Lecture 29

p. 464

W ’67

February 16

p. 522

(Equivalence of settings)

S ’67

Lecture 9

p. 560

Terms within each subsets of [+] [0] [-] are treated as equivalent (Re. responding to HAY)

F ’67

Lecture 14

pp. 740-743

(Non-equivalent ‘identicals’: “Tuesday” vs. “November 11, 1967”)

S ’68

May 29

pp. 789-790

(“X is just like Y”)

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

p. 77

Constraints on to whom somebody can be compared

S ’72

Lecture 5

pp. 568-569

Second speakers for talk about (e.g. disasters as events in “our lives”) talk about them comparatively (1st speaker says X happened, 2nd says “to me too” or “not to me”, etc.), “Though the events didn’t happen comparatively.”

Complaints

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 12

pp. 358, 359-360

S ’67

Lecture 8

pp. 549-550

S ’67

Lecture 11

pp. 575-577

Lecture 15.1

pp. 599-600

‘Safe’ complaints

F ’67

Lecture 2

p. 634-638

About violations of ‘one at a time’

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

pp. 45-55

“You interrupted me”

F ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 94-97

“This place costs too much money.”

Fragment

pp. 150-151

“You never take me anywhere”

W ’71

February 19

pp. 296-298

“Wasn’t that the dirtiest place?”

March 4

pp. 313-314

p. 316

A ‘fragile’ complaint (Louise’s Friday night)

Building a reasonable complaint

F ’71

Lecture 3

p. 433

Having made a complaint, the complaining itself becomes the topic.

Lecture 14

pp. 502-503

“That guy” in a complaint by wife about husband

Completion

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 12

pp. 96, 103

F ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 158-159

‘Incomplete utterances’

S ’66

Lecture 5

pp. 310-311

‘Adequate complete utterances’; ‘utterance completers’

Lecture 15

pp. 376-377

 Indicating that a sentence is not a complete utterance

W ’67

March 2

pp. 524-526, 527

Orientation to completion

F ’67

Lecture 3

pp. 643-645

Orientation to completion / complete and incomplete utterances. “transition events”

Lecture 4

pp. 647-655

Utterance completion

Lecture 5

pp. 656-659

Utterance completion / complete actions

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 3

pp. 33-34

pp. 39-40

p. 43

‘Completion-transition points’

Recognizably complete utterances

‘Adequate complete utterance’

Lecture 4

p. 44

“First ‘possible completion’ to be treated as actual completion

Lecture 5

pp. 57-58

pp. 59,60

Listening for ‘completion’

“Possible utterance ends”

W ’69

Lecture 3

p. 109

Seeable completion of a one-word utterance

Lecture 9

pp. 144-146

Signaling utterance completion / incompletion

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 182

Signaling utterance completion / incompletion

Lecture 4

p. 191

A greeting as an ‘adequate complete utterance’

S ’70

Lecture 2

p. 224

p. 228

“Next possible completion”

Story completion

Lecture 8

pp. 286-287

Packaging one’s opinions into a story ‘what she said, what I said’, etc. giving no chance for quarrel by current coparticipants “at each sentence-end.”

F ’71

Lecture 2

p. 430

Incompletion vis-à-vis obscenity

Lecture 4

p. 438

Completing another’s utterance

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 527

‘Possible completion’ via adjacency pairs

Compliments

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 8

pp. 60-61

‘Safe compliment’

S ’66

Lecture 29

pp. 464-465

‘Weak, safe compliment’

S ’67

Lecture 15.1

pp. 597-599

‘Safe’ compliments

S ’68

May 29

pp. 793-794

Compliments produced as ‘indirect quotes’ (“I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed your class this morning”)

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 2

pp. 98-103

‘Safe compliments’

S ’70

Lecture 7

pp. 272-273

p. 278

“Boy there goes a great gal”

‘Safe compliments’

W ’71

February 19

p. 296

Complimenting person who brought you to a restaurant, instead of the chef

Context

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 14

pp. 370-375

Lecture 27

pp. 450-455

Contrast

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 11

p. 88

S ’66

Lecture 12

p. 358

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 679-680

Vis-à-vis sarcasm

Lecture 13

p. 736

Via emphasis: “No let’s take my car.”

S ’68

May 29

pp. 787-788

pp. 798-800

Contrast class ‘true-false’

In-and-out

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 171-172

‘Today’ as one among a contrast class: ‘time references’ vs. unique applicability

W ’71

March 4

pp. 315-316

Finding a ‘deleted’ term via occurrence of its contrast: “After 25 years [of X] they got divorced.” X=marriage.

S ’71

Lecture 4

p. 558

Contrast-stressing intonation

Conveying Information (See also ‘Getting Something Done…”)

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

p. 283

Via order of introductions

Correction-Invitation Device

Volume I

F ’64 -    S ’65

Lecture 2

pp. 21-23

S ’66

Lecture 15

pp. 380-381

Correctness / Truth

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 13

pp. 105, 110-111

Proverbs as “correct for something”

Lecture 14

pp. 114, 116

p. 118

p. 118-119

Of a guess

‘Presumptive correctness’ of an application of a procedure (Job’s Problem)

Presumptively correct descriptions

Lecture 14

pp. 114, 116

p. 118

p. 118-119

Of a guess

‘Presumptive correctness’ of a application of a procedure (Job’s Problem)

Presumptively correct descriptions

 

F ’65

Lecture 14

p. 206

Incidentally correct for [X]

Lecture 6

p. 166

Proverbially correct

Lecture 12

 

pp. 358, 360

Of some possible fact

 

S ’66

Lecture 21

pp. 424-425

Of “if we start out discussing, we end up fighting”

Lecture 26

p. 444

Of a statement

Lecture 30

p. 469

Of something the natives say.

Lecture 31

pp. 474-475

Children’s monitoring of correctness in speech

Appendix A

p. 501

p. 506

Young children’s talk

Children’s correcting of errors in speech

Appendix A

p. 501

p. 506

Young children’s talk

Children’s correcting of errors in speech

 

S ’67

Lecture 9

pp. 557-566

p. 564

Truth of a Member’s statement (“Everyone Has to Lie”)

Answers constructed by reference to a procedure’s use and not by reference to what is ‘correct’

Lecture 12

p. 581

‘Correctly’ produced hints; ‘correctly’ need not mean ‘true’.  (vis-à-vis  ‘phoney’)

Lecture 14

pp. 740-742

Of alternative ‘correct’ temporal references, one can be appropriate, another crazy.

Lecture 14

pp. 740-742

Of alternative ‘correct’ temporal references, one can be appropriate, another crazy.

 

S ’68

May 29

p. 787

‘Showing an intention of truth by some statement.’…‘exhibiting “correctness”.’

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

pp. 74, 80

“Because it’s true” is irrelevant as an account.

 

W ’69

Lecture 7

pp. 115-116

‘Password’ answers as ‘correct’ in some independence of being true.

 

S ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 222

Correctness vs. relevance

Lecture 3

pp. 234-236

Assessable correctness of a story

 

W ’71

March 4

pp. 316-317

Possible correctness of a members’ formulation (“He was being very rational”)

 

S ’71

May 3

pp. 384-390

Persons’ techniques for assessing possible correctness of an offered solution to their problem.

Lecture 4

p. 443

Listening technique for spouses: monitoring the other’s stories for its correct presentation; putting in corrections.

 

F ’71

Lecture 5

p. 447

One “correct” identity replaced by another instead of cumulated.

Counting

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 8

pp. 60-63

F ’65

Lecture 14

p. 208

S ’66

Lecture 4

p. 305

Lecture 12

pp. 360-362

Lecture 24

pp. 435-440

Measurement Systems

Couples-talk

Volume I

F ’67

Lecture 8

p. 690

Vis-à-vis pre-invitations

Lecture 10

p. 703-704

Vis-à-vis separation of  sexes at gatherings

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 4

pp. 437-443

How to listen to spouse’s retold stories

Lecture 14

pp. 502-503

“That guy” in complaint by wife about husband

Lecture 15

pp. 506-507

‘Wives’ perhaps not in full agreement with a story version (Kim: “We should have just left everything alone” and Jan: “He probably knew”)

Description

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 4

p. 30-31

Lecture 6

p. 42

Lecture 8

p. 65

Lecture 13

pp. 110-112

‘Potential descriptions’: Proverbs

F ’65

­­Lecture 12

p. 201

‘Potentially correct description’

Appendix A

p. 228-229

‘Potentially correct description’

S ’66

Lecture 1

p. 237

‘Possible description’ (baby cried…)

Lecture 1 (R)

p. 245 ff

‘Possible description’ (baby cried…)

Lecture 2

p. 252 ff

‘Possible description’ (baby cried…)

Lecture 30

pp. 469-471

Describability

Appendix A

pp. 498-500

Describability of children’s games

S ’67

Lecture 13

p. 588

Identification via category bound action as ‘correct description’

S ’68

May 29

p. 795

Describing events via that they happened in teller’s life.

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 9

pp. 147-149

Preference for ‘you know what I’m talking about’ description

Fragment

pp. 150-151

Alternative descriptive verbs; e.g., ‘helping X’ vs. ‘doing’; ‘taking X to’ vs. going to’.

W ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 180-181

“Recognition-type descriptions”

S ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 215-221

Descriptions built to be ‘ordinary’

Lecture 3

pp. 231-232, 236

pp. 234-236

“Course-of-action” report, into which a story is placed.

Assessable correctness of a description

S ’72

Lecture 2

pp. 540-541

Descriptions vary across to whom the thing is being described

Directedness of an Utterance

Volume I

F ’65

­­Lecture 14

p. 219

News reporter’s question on behalf of public

S ’66

Lecture 04.b

pp. 296-299

Instructions directed to A, hold for B, C, D

Lecture 15

pp. 377-378

1st speaker rule regulates speaker and non-speakers

Lecture 16

p. 388

Possessive pronoun use shifts via who’s being talked to.

W ’67

March 2

pp. 529-534

Instructions directed to A, hold for B, C, D. Doing X to A is doing Y to B.

S ’67

Lecture 17

p. 610

Possessive pronoun use varies by reference to who is talking to whom.

F ’67

Lecture 6

pp. 665-666

Instructions directed to A, hold for B, C, D. Doing X to A is doing Y to B.

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

p. 91

p. 93

Noticing directed to the person who was just talking

‘Conversational action’: saying X about Y’s Z can be ‘flirting’, ‘insulting’, etc.

Lecture 2

pp. 99-102

Doing X to A is doing Y to B

W ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 191-192

Greetings directed to “somebody”; to whom can be “a technical problem”.

S ’70

Lecture 7

pp. 276-281

What does a non-“direct recipient” of an utterance make of it? ; Doing X to A is doing Y to B.

S ’72

Lecture 3

p. 553

Telephone answerer as ‘overhearing’ called’s feelings about called, exhibited in how caller asks answerer for called.

Dreams

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 16

pp. 512-518

Eating Together

Volume I

S ’68

May 29

pp. 791-792, 794

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 203-204

W ’71

March 11

pp. 318-331

(‘Herring’)

Emblems

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 17

pp. 392-395

Volume II

S ’67

Lecture 17

p. 612

Entitlement

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

­­Lecture 9

pp. 68-69

 

­­Lecture 11

p. 91

F ’65

Lecture 8

p. 180

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 243-248

Entitlement to experience

Erasability

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

­­Lecture 8

pp. 61-62

­­Lecture 13

p. 108

Error

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 11

p. 84

Experts’ errors

F ’65

­­Lecture 9

p. 186

Grammatical awkwardness (“the guy’ll pick the guy up”) provides occasion for emphasis (the repeat of “dirty grubby tee shirt”)

S ’66

Lecture 8

p. 337

No occasions for seeing ‘incorrect’ness

Lecture 31

pp. 474-475

Appendix A

p. 506

Detectable errors

F ’67

Lecture 3

pp. 641-642

Grammatical awkwardness provides for unplannedness of a rebuke.  (“I thought I could help him with supervision”)

Lecture 8

pp. 690-691

A request for information ‘corrected to’ a pre-request (“What is – what are those, cigars?”)

Lecture 12

p. 724

Names: predictably wrongly transcribed

Lecture 13

pp. 730-735

Tying based mis-hearings

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 9

p. 143

‘Gist preserving errors’

W ’71

March 4

p. 307

“Roof” instead of ‘ceiling’ via a sound sequence: “room” “roof”

F ’71

Lecture 2

p. 429

p. 430

Error: “roof” instead of ‘ceiling’: common occurrence: recipients focus on it and…correct it.

A piece of research: see whether if someone produces a possible error, others later exhibit that they picked up on it, though they didn’t say anything at the time.

Lecture 12

p. 491

Language errors via over-application of a rule

Etiquette

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 7, 8

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

p. 284

Lecture 04.b

p. 297

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 5

p. 61

p. 64

W ’70

Lecture 5

p. 208

S ’71

April 30

p. 380

May 21

p. 408

Evidence

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 24-25

Lecture 13

p. 105

‘Ex-Relationals’

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 7

pp. 462-463

Exemplary Occurrences

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 11

pp. 196-198

Explanations [See Accountables, Accounts, Explanations, etc.]

“Face-to-face” Materials, Observations, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 7

p. 50-51

Cigarette-lighting

Lecture 12

p. 102-103

Physical co-presence conversation

F ’67

Lecture 6

p. 673

“Eye-monitoring” for speaker-selection in multi-party conversation

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 5

pp. 65-66

Physical movements prior to being introduced; timing of eye contact

W ’69

Lecture 1

p. 91

Looking at speaker noticing something about them

Lecture 8

 

pp. 130-131

Re-arranging physical proximities

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 167

Noticing changes in someone’s appearance, possessions, etc. (Private calendar)

Lecture 4

p. 193

Approaching parties withholding greetings until such a point as they can achieve a greeting-only interaction.

S ’71

May 10

pp. 394-395

Male doctor lighting female patient’s cigarette

S ’72

Lecture 6

 

pp. 571-572

Other occurrences during a ‘laughing together’: change color, move, look at each other

Fitted Talk

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 4

Greetings

S ’66

Lecture 6

p. 313

Reciprocal Identification

W ’67

March 9

p. 537

2nd stories

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 675-676

‘Language shifts’ in ‘utterance pairs’

Lecture 9

p. 693

S ’68

April 17

pp. 753-754

Characterizations fitted to topic (e.g. “The woman who lives there now”; e.g. “across the street” from Bullock’s)

April 24

pp. 769-771

2nd stories

May 8

pp. 781-782

2nd stories

May 29

pp. 795-797

2nd stories

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 3

pp. 112-113

Fitted actions show understanding

Foreshortened / Expanded Sequences

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 159-169

Re. greeting sequences

Formulation

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 9

pp. 68-69

Lecture 10

p. 78

Lecture 12

p. 103

A 1st conversation as a version of an Nth

F ’65

Lecture 6

p. 166

‘We’ formulated in terms of ‘you’

Lecture 8

pp. 180-181

Lecture 10

pp. 190-191

Lecture 14

pp. 205-207

Alternative categorical formulations

W ’67

February 16

pp. 515-522

Vis-à-vis ‘settings’

March 9

pp. 543-544

No room in the world for ‘just formulating’

F ’67

Lecture 2

pp. 637-638

No free room for ‘just formulating’

S ’68

April 17

pp. 753-754

Characterizations of persons, places and ‘age class’ by reference to the topic at hand.

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 46

Not a sharp enough characterization, i.e. that “X is a formulation”

Lecture 6

pp. 73-74

‘Orientational’ formulations

W ’69

Lecture 8

pp. 126-129

pp. 133-135

 ‘Identification reformulations’

‘Abstract’ vs. ‘concrete’ formulations

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 181

 ‘Gifts’ vs. ‘giftware’ (“formulation of who it is that’s talking to whom”)

S ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 218-219

 Banal characterizations: “It was nothing much”, “It was outta sight.”

W ’71

February 19

pp. 293-294

 “Parties” (vs. e.g. groups) & “giftware” as terminology by personnel, not clientele

March 4

p. 309

Alternative formulations for expressing positions on reported event (“had to go” vs. “said he had to go”)

S ’71

April 23

pp. 367-369

 Re. “Talk, you mean get drunk…” ‘Correct partial formulations’

April 26

p. 371

p. 374

‘Going out with parents’ as “an altogether drastic reformulation” of ‘going out and getting drunk’

“…what some evenings are to be charaterizably devoted to, without regard to how anyone happens to spend an evening.”

May 21

pp. 404-405

“Mr. Jones came into the room” vs. “he came into the room”

May 24

p. 413

Post-“What?” reformulation

F ’71

Lecture 7

pp. 463-464

Lecture 15

pp. 507-509

Freedom of Occurrence

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 6

“I can’t hear you”, “Huh?” as ‘occasionally usable’ device: can come at any place

F ’65

Lecture 9

p. 183

Freedom of positioning of clauses

Lecture 14

p. 209

p. 213

Freedom of positioning of clauses

In choosing 1st person in ‘a series’ of introductions

Volume II

W ’71

February 19

p. 293

Freedom of occurrence of expletives

F ’71

Lecture 11

p. 485

Freedom of occurrence of jokes

S ’72

Lecture 2

pp. 534-535

‘Freedom of occurrence rule’ for adjacency pair first pair parts.

Games / Play

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 7

(Imagine)…skipping a move

Lecture 6

p. 48

As “model conflict situations”

Lecture 11

p. 87

Poker as a model for currencies

Lecture 13

pp. 106-107

‘Families’ of games

F ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 160-161

Insult games, playing the dozens

Lecture 10

p. 191

Hotrodders vs. cops

Lecture 11

pp. 193-194

Schelling’s war games

S ’66

Lecture 5

p. 307

Re. “I’m a military man”

Lecture 12

pp. 360-362

Hotrodders vs. cops (countable successes)

Lecture 13

pp. 363-369

Button-Button

Lecture 31

pp. 473-478

Legal and illegal actions in games

Appendix A

pp. 489-506

‘On some formal properties of children’s games’

W ’67

March 2

pp. 531-532

Playing at challenges

F ’67

Lecture 7

p. 679

Playing the dozens

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 3

pp. 105-107, 110

p. 112

Re. “Turn on the microphone”

Imitative play

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 161

“Voice recognition games”

S ’72

Lecture 3

p. 550

Voice “recognition games”

Getting Something Done Without ‘Doing’ It

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 4

p. 7

Getting someone to give their name (providing a slot vs. asking)

Lecture 2

pp. 15-16

Avoid giving helps (treat trouble as a joke)

Lecture 10

p. 76

Providing that help will be offered without being asked for. (request for information) [cf. “Can you fix this needle?”]

S ’66

Lecture 04.b

p. 293

Mistreating someone (not doing to them what is being done in a round)

Lecture 7

pp. 324-325

Hotrodders vs. cops

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

pp. 73-74

Inviting-rejecting a new entrant via formulation of topic

W ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 176-178

pp. 180-181

Conveying information without requiring a response (“Did you have the day off?” and “Mac…put [your newspaper] up on your porch”

Conveying a scurrilous suggestion without being nasty

S ’70

Lecture 7

pp. 272-274

“Boy there goes a great gal”: dealing with awhile-ago events; utterances “specifically intended to be connected in some way, while also having their connectedness not directly available in other ways.”

Lecture 8

p. 284

Where saying that an unfair question is unfair, is problematic, you can, by your answer, make it, show it to be, an unfair question.  (Hippie producer)

S ’71

May 24

p. 413

“What?” can get a clarification without disclosing lack of understanding (can pass as the ‘preferred’ hearing problem)

F ’71

Lecture 6

p. 455

Indicating that something was “normal” without saying it.

Glancing

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 7

p. 50

Lecture 11

pp. 81-94

Gossip

Volume I

F ’67

Lecture 2

pp. 639-640

Lecture 10

pp. 703-704

S ’68

May 8

p. 776

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

pp. 52-53

“People in that neighborhood are rude”

W ’69

Lecture 8

p. 132

Greetings

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 4

Lecture 12

pp. 96-99

p. 97

No rule of exclusion

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

pp. 284-285

Greeting substituted vis-à-vis ‘no-naming’

Lecture 5

pp. 308-309

‘Ahistorically relevant’ / no rule of exclusion

S ’67

Lecture 8

pp. 551-554

p. 554

‘Ahistorically relevant’ / no rule of exclusion

‘Greeting substitute’

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 3

pp. 35-36

No exclusion rule / “remain relevant”

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 158-169

‘Greeting sequence’ (foreshortened / expanded)

Lecture 4

pp. 188-199

S ’72

Lecture 3

p. 544

Answerer’s “Hello” as a “greeting” by a possible ‘Called’ to a possible to-called-caller.

Groups

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 145-146

Lecture 6

p. 168

Lecture 7

pp. 169-170

Lecture 8

pp. 175-176

F ’67

Lecture 10

p. 703

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 5

p. 65

Introducing someone to ‘members of a group’

Lecture 6

 

p. 78

pp. 78-79

‘Member’ talk: asserting a variable without stating its value (e.g. “It’s a 1950.”  (cf. pp. 235-236, “Competence” via “usualness measures” vs. “more precise characterizations”)

Simmel’s notion of ‘completeness’

W ’69

Lecture 7

pp. 121-123

Membership in “kids’ groups” (hotrodders, hippies)

Happenstance vs. Systematic

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

pp. 3-4

Re. 2nd stories’ similarity to 1sts

Lecture 2

p. 25

Re. one is incidental, 2 maybe not

W ’71

February 19

p. 292

Re. poetics phenomena

March 4

p. 305

Re. 2nd stories similarity to 1sts

S ’71

April 30

p. 377

Re. SPC caller not giving her name

May 21

p. 404

Re. a replicated triplet: the 1st at start of call, the 2nd at close.

Hell as a Mnemonic Technique

Volume I

S ’68

April 17

pp. 759-760

Volume II

S ’71

May 17

p. 399

‘Helping’

Volume I

S ’68

April 29

pp. 788-789

Hinting

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 1 (R)

pp. 249-250

“I was a hair stylist…”

Lecture 08

pp. 329-332

S ’67

Lecture 12

pp. 578-581

“I was a hair stylist” etc. etc.

Lecture 14

p. 595

A seeable ‘hint; a ‘hint’ in a double sense (“What’s new, gentlemen?”)

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 3

pp. 431-435

Allusive talk: sex

Identification (See also ‘Categories & Classes’)

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 5-6

Stranger-stranger (vs. helper-helper)

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

pp. 289-290

‘Sufficiency of an identification’ problem (“Who’s Jim Reed?” / “Who’s Fido?”)

Lecture 5

pp. 306-307

‘Proffering an identification’

Lecture 6

p. 313

pp. 317-319

‘Proffering an identification’

‘Cover identifications’

Lecture 7

pp. 326-327

‘Unique solution’: via category bound to activity

(cf. pp. 714-715) (“That’s Una’s mother”) Nth person solution: relational pairs.

Lecture 08

pp. 328-332

Orientation: ‘phony’ / hinting

Lecture 12

p. 362

Via. Making a complaint

Lecture 18

p. 399

‘Uniquely-selected’ identification category via category bound to activity.

Lecture 21

pp. 417-420

‘Intentional misidentification’

W ’67

March 2

p. 532

“Possible identifications invocable in a sense”

March 9

p. 544

‘Intentional misidentification’ (broken down into intentional mis-address; ‘intentional mis-reference’.)

S ’67

Lecture 12

pp. 580-581

‘Hints at identification’

Lecture 13

 

pp. 588-589

Selecting identifications via category bound activities

Lecture 14

 

pp. 592-594

‘Cover’ identifications

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 676-680

‘Intentional mis-address’

Lecture 011

pp. 712-713

Focusing on relevance of an identification category

S ’68

April 17

p. 753

Identifications as ‘’topic carriers’: people & places

May 8

pp. 774-775

Request and rejection via identification ‘stewardess’

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

p. 73

Vis-à-vis orientation formulations

W ’69

Lecture 8

pp. 126-129

‘Identification reformulation’

W ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 201-202

Identity transformation

W ’71

March 11

pp. 327-330

Identity transformation

May 21

pp. 404-405

“Mr. Jones” vs. “he” (Virginia Woolf)

F ’71

Lecture 5

pp. 444-452

Selecting identifications; preference for Type I over Type II identification

Lecture 8

p. 466

Identity transformation

Lecture 10

p. 482

Re. “a series of identities”, where ‘mother-daughter’ is “crucial”.

Lecture 12

p. 490

Re. “a series of identities”, where ‘mother-daughter’ is “crucial”.

S’72

Lecture 3

pp. 542-553

‘Caller-Answerer-Called’ etc.

Ideology

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 9

p. 70

F ’65

Lecture 14

p. 214

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 187

‘The ideological foundations of perception’

Idioms, Tokens, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 8-10

“May I help you”

F ’65

Lecture 4

p. 156

Lecture 14

pp. 212, 220

“I don’t lose any sleep over it”

S ’66

Lecture 12

pp. 358-359

“That’s the problem with society.”

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 5

p. 58

“Through circumstances” “beyond their control”

S ’71

May 17

pp. 396-397

Various spatialized idioms in SPC:NYE call

F ’71

Lecture 1

p. 421

“They need…something to look up to.”

Images

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 4

p. 7

“Multi-dimensional jigsaw puzzle”

Game

Lecture 13

p. 111

Human language, as “alike to that of other animals”: narrative commentary

F ’65

Lecture 5

p. 159

“The warehouse”

S ’66

Lecture 1

pp. 237-238

“The little tiny things that God might have forgotten”

Lecture 11

pp. 348-349

“Interruption and completion” involves passing a sentence like a relay race

Lecture 21

p. 425

“Warehouse”

Lecture 33

p. 484

“A machine with a couple of holes in front…spew[ing] out garbage” from the back.

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 9

p. 138

“In the worn out stone that was a statue; you can see a smoothed down face…”

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 169

“Over aim is to…transform, in almost a literal, physical sense, one view of what happen[s]…to interactions being spewed out by machinery, the machinery being what we’re trying to find”

Lecture 3

p. 240

Machinery produces orderly events, but most orderly events are byproducts.

S ’70

Lecture 8

p. 282

“You could always figure if [a question] is one you mind it’s in other people’s minds.  It’s like a fly that’s moving around the room and now it’s ion your shoulder; it just happened to settle there…”

W ’71

March 4

p. 313

Delicate perspectives, “like a seven-layer cake or a flickering candle, get passed on for generations as a reasonable characterization of the world, without getting smashed…”

F ’71

Lecture 2

p. 428

Duck / rabbit illusions vis-à-vis proverbial expressions’ empirical / proverbial sense vis-à-vis unnoticed puns.

Lecture 8

p. 469

“It’s as thought the stories in people’s heads are more or less constantly alert for the occasions for which they are distinctly apt.”

Lecture 12

p. 493

Dirty jokes “can move within the groups…informing its members of [matters] of distinct interest to just those groups, [as], e.g., private newsletters for small or large stockholders can do that kind of a job, or a motorcycle magazine can do that for motorcyclists.”

S ’72

Lecture 3

pp. 548-549

p. 553

Re. introduction of the telephone.  “Now what happens is, like any other natural object, a culture secretes itself onto it in its well-shaped ways…This technical apparatus is, then, being made at home with the rest of our world.”

Answerer’s ‘Hello’, “if it exhibits an emotion; exhibits an emotion to the world… So that it’s a flair sent up as compared to an aimed emotion.”

Imitation

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 9

pp. 70-71

S ’66

Lecture 31

p. 477

Lecture 32

pp. 479-482

Appendix A

pp. 503-504

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 3

pp. 111-112

Importance, Interestingness, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 7

Rules of etiquette

Lecture 4

p. 28

Kings, votes, revolution

S ’66

Lecture 04.b

p. 293

Scandal, discourse of kings, etc. vs. greetings

Lecture 6

p. 312

‘Deviance’, ‘failure of integration’, ‘role strains’

Lecture 23

pp. 428-430

Where is language deep and interesting, “What not to study”

Lecture 30

pp. 470-471

pp. 471-472

Why do scientists do science?

‘Attitudes toward authority’ (Student Q)

Lecture 33

p. 483ff

Finding “good” problems: crime rate, bank loan rate, political order, etc.

W ’67

February 16

p. 522

Jet set, Pentagon Chart Room…4 kids on a Saturday morning…All settings are equivalent.

March 9

pp. 541-542

‘One’s life’ / ‘a promise’ vs. ‘embarassability’/‘respect for topical organization’

S ’67

Lecture 9

p. 563

“Everyone has to lie” sounds interesting, “everyone is in a position to have to choose whether to lie or not” sounds uninteresting

F ’67

Lecture 5

p. 664

“The things in the world that are going to count theoretically…will not necessarily come with labels on them: ‘Look at me, I’m really important.’”

Lecture 14

p. 741

p. 743

“Why do people stop at stoplights?” & “Why don’t people rape their neighbors?” vs. “You are only at the point where sociology is interesting when you can see that ‘Tuesday’ is the right sort of answer…and ‘November eleventh’…would get you committed.”

“The sheer appropriateness of such an answer as ‘Tuesday’ beguiles you into figuring that there could be nothing interesting present in its being done.”

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 57

Interestingness of collaborative utterances

Lecture 5

p. 62

‘Nothing much’ phenomenon can be an object for regulation (upper-class English return whatever greeting they’re offered.)

W ’69

Lecture 8

pp. 133-134

“Large scale interest” of possible preferences for concrete (vs. abstract) conversation

W ’70

Lecture 5

p. 204

“Really interesting mechanisms going on” in “these incredibility nothing-happening happenings of conversation”

S ’70

Lecture 1

p. 215

“What sort of large-scale interest does what people make stories of or what they don’t make stories of, have?”

Lecture 2

p. 226

Story preface as ‘interest arouses’

Lecture 4

pp. 247-248

Locating the importance of a story’s events

W ’71

March 11

p. 325

Treating the ‘poetics’ phenomenon as ‘really outrageously’ important

F ’71

Lecture 1

p. 420

Interesting aspects of the world, that are as yet unknown, are accessible to observation.

Lecture 8

p. 467

“A question that can be either banal or deep…is this: Why do people transmit information to others?”

S ’72

Lecture 3

p. 542

“There is a rule for telephone-call beginning which may sound awfully trivial but has turned out to have varieties of interesting theoretical implications.

Lecture 4

pp. 554-555

“A lot of this [consideration of ‘next position’] will sound awfully banal but it’s far from that…it’s not, after all, something anyone could have said; it’s not that it’s nothing; it’s not that it has no consequences.”

Lecture 5

pp. 562-563

Re. talk about disasters goes at the beginning of conversations.  Specification: if introduceable as a “How are you” – type questions.  “And that little specification may turn out to wag the disasters.”

Incongruity

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 11

pp. 89-90, 92

Indexical Expressions

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 5

p. 32

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 148-149

‘We’

Lecture 4

pp. 150-154

Lecture 6

pp. 164-168

“You”… ‘We’

Lecture 7

p. 169

‘We’

Lecture 9

p. 182

Lecture 14

p. 206

‘You’

S ’66

Lecture 8

pp. 333-336

‘We’

Lecture 10

pp. 342-343

Pro-verbs

Lecture 11

pp. 348-353

‘You’…‘We’…‘it’

Lecture 14

pp. 374-375

Re. Tying Rules

Lecture 15

pp. 376-378

p. 377

Re. Tying Rules

Pro-verbs

Lecture 16

pp. 382-383, 387-388

Possessive pronouns

Lecture 29

pp. 461-463

Place references (‘here’, etc.)

S ’67

Lecture 11

pp. 568-575

‘We’

Lecture 16

pp. 605-606

Possessive pronoun ‘my’

Lecture 17

pp. 613-615

Pro-verbs

F ’67

Lecture 7

p. 675

Pronouns are not substitutes for nouns

Lecture 011

pp. 711-715

Various pronouns (“tying phenomenon”)

Volume II

W ’69

Fragment

pp. 153-154

Pronoun use in early logic

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 182

“They”

W ’71

February 19

p. 291

 “WE went [to a bar] and…THEY had an after dinner drink.”

S ’71

April 26

pp. 373-374

Ambiguity of ‘you’ as to singular / plural reference.

May 10

p. 391

“We” & “They” are not only plural references, but also…‘organizational references’

May 21

pp. 404-405

“He” to identify someone entering, in Virginia Woolf novels

F ’71

Lecture 5

pp. 445-446

Pronoun & relational terms vis-à-vis recipient design

Indirect Actions (See ‘Getting something done without doing it’)

Volume I

Volume II

Inference

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 14

p. 115ff

Definition: “Deal[ing] with, categoriz[ing] and mak[ing] statements about an event [one] has not seen.”

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 6

p. 457

Re. “warding off inferences that could be made from [a] specific event [being described].”

Informants

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 4

p. 27

Information: Packaging and Transmission

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 13

pp. 110-111

Lecture 14

p. 116

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

pp. 69-71

In Introductions

W ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 176-178

pp. 180-181

Conveying information without requiring a response to it (here, doing a favor without requiring “Thanks”; answering return of husband without making it a topic

 

Conveying information via ‘elaborating a recognition type description’

F ’71

Lecture 8

pp. 466-469

Preserving and transmitting knowledge via stories

Lecture 11

pp. 485-486

Dirty jokes: ‘pass with discretion’

Lecture 12

pp. 489-490

pp. 492-494

Sexual information packaged in dirty joke

Dirty joke as “a private newsletter”

Innocence (See Playing Dumb)

Volume I

Volume II

Institutional Use of Ordinary Devices

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 8

“May I help you”

Lecture 2

p. 22

Police use correction-invitation device

Volume II

S ’71

April 30

p. 380

“May I help you”

Insults

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 160-161

S ’66

Lecture 11

p. 351

Lecture 21

p. 419

Lecture 26

p. 446

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 678-679

Closing off an insult sequence

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 7

pp. 276-280

S ’71

April 26

pp. 374-375

You can be offended at how someone figures you spend Saturday night even if you spend it in an even feebler way than what they’d proposed.  (talk vs. get drunk vs. going to dinner with parents).

Interruption (See ‘Turn-taking)

Volume I

Volume II

Intimacy

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 2

p. 14

pp. 17-19

‘A special class of others’

Invitations no longer relevant

Lecture 10

pp. 73-74

Accounts of how one came to the call; such accounts not used between intimates

S ’67

Lecture 9

pp. 560-562

Restrictions on exchange of ‘personal state’ information

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 50

‘Interruption’ as index of intimacy

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 162

Re. call scheduling

Lecture 4

p. 196

Between strangers doing tragedy / disaster

Lecture 5

p. 204

Re. telephone call openings

S ’70

Lecture 4

p. 248

“Even…what you thought was a friend” will require an “anybody” storytelling

W ’71

March 4

p. 311

‘Intimate complaining’

S ’71

May 21

pp. 405-406

Caller to SPC apologizing to the professional for the “bother” “is focusing on that we might be intimates but we’re not.”

F ’71

Lecture 15

p. 511

Intimate problem (family) talked about conventionally, unintimately.

S ’72

Lecture 3

p. 544

“Intimate conversation of sorts” between caller and phone-answerer-not-called

Intonation

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 14

p. 373

Question-intonation?

W ’67

March 9

p. 543

Systematically characterizable activities “I did”, “I did”

F ’67

Lecture 4

p. 651

“Intonation contour”

Lecture 13

pp. 735-736

Accent (emphasis); e.g. “I did”, “I did”

“No let’s take my car”

S ’68

May 29

p. 788

“I thought X” vs. “I thought X”

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 2

p. 22

“I did”, “I did”

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 160, 162

“Yeah” vs. “Yeah?” by called, to “[Name]?”

Lecture 5

p. 203

“Yeah” vs. “Yeah?” by called, to “[Name]?”

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 526

Question intonation in the course of an utterance; coparticipant does “Uh huh”

Lecture 4

pp. 558-559

Intonation can position an utterance (e.g. doubting “We:::ll,” e.g. contrast stressing.)

Introductions

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 3

p. 148

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

pp. 281-291

Lecture 04.b

pp. 292-299

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

pp. 69-71

Invitations

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 2

pp. 18-19

Lecture 10

p. 73

F ’65

Lecture 8

pp. 175-176

S ’66

Lecture 4

pp. 301-305

Lecture 6

pp. 312-313

Lecture 29

pp. 465-466

S ’68

May 29

pp. 791-793

Interactionally generated invitations

Volume II

W’ 70

Lecture 5

pp. 210-211

Interactionally generated invitations

S ’71

April 23

pp. 367-368

‘First-preference invitations’

S ’72

Lecture 1

pp. 528-529

Invitations as ‘first pair parts’

Lecture 6

p. 571

p. 575

Re. “whether laugh offerings are accepted or not.”

Interactionally generated invitations

Job’s Problem

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 2

p. 20

Lecture 14

p. 118

S ’66

Lecture 20

p. 412

Jokes, Joke-Serious Alternation, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 2

pp. 12-16

p. 16

Treating announcement of suicidalness as a joke

Joking response to “How are you?”

Lecture 12

pp. 99-100

Sequential character of

 

S ’66

Lecture 04.b

pp. 294-295

Jokes come in rounds

Lecture 27

p. 451

Obscene jokes / “a chaining of humor”

 

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 682-684

Announcing that a joke is forthcoming

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 8

p. 131

Laughing at someone’s joke to show sexual interest in taller.

 

W ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 205-206

Joking relationships

 

F ’71

Lecture 9

pp. 470-477

The dirty joke as a technical object

Lecture 10

pp. 478-482

The dirty joke as a technical object

Lecture 11

 

pp. 483-488

The dirty joke as a technical object

Lecture 12

 

pp. 489-494

The dirty joke as a technical object

Knowledge

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 8

“I don’t know”

Lecture 3

p. 23

Common knowledge

Lecture 5

p. 33

“I don’t know”

Lecture 6

pp. 40-42, 46

Lecture 9

p. 69

Lecture 10

p. 83

‘Feigning ignorance’

Lecture 13

pp. 109-110

F ’65

Lecture 8

p. 180

‘Protected against induction’

Lecture 11

pp. 196, 198

‘Protected against induction’

Lecture 12

p. 202

Lay vs. scientific

Lecture 14

p. 222

Greek “know thyself” as not private

S ’66

Lecture 8

pp. 336-340

‘Protected against induction’

Lecture 14

p. 374

“I don’t know”

Lecture 17

pp. 394-395

‘Protected against induction’ (scientists’ sins as otherwise reasonable procedures.)

Lecture 19

p. 406

How do you know your own appearance?

Lecture 30

pp. 470-471

Why do scientists do science?

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 244-245

“Stock of knowledge” vs. “stock of experiences”

F ’71

Lecture 8

pp. 466-469

Preserving & transmitting knowledge via stories (vis-à-vis one’s own experiences)

Laughing

Volume I

F ’67

Lecture 14

pp. 745-746

“Laughing is one prototypical thing that people can be doing together…”

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 8

p. 131

Laughing at someone’s joke to indicate sexual interest

W ’70

Lecture 5

p. 207

Getting someone ‘laughing along’ before doing touchy business (‘Power tools’)

S ’70

Lecture 7

pp. 274-276

p. 280

Pre-positioned “heh”s in a story

Lecture 8

pp. 284-288

“heh Wh(hh)en I grow up! heh heh …” Heckling (stories)

S ’71

May 10

p. 395

((Laughs)) “You’re making me laugh.  I must be feeling better”

F ’71

Lecture 11

p. 486

“Laughing in an appropriately timed way sufficiently indicates an appreciation of [a] joke.”

S ’72

Lecture 6

pp. 570-572

Laughing together

Lay-Professional / Lay-Scientific, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 10

Diagnostic term “regressed” / lay affiliate

Lecture 5

pp. 38-39

Re. non-conformance to a theory

Lecture 6

p. 42

Lay theories of social actions

Lecture 8

p. 59

‘Normal’ as “a medical device”

Lecture 9

p. 69

[Lay] theory of how men select a mate

Lecture 14

p. 115

p. 121

Lay notion: simple actions, simple explanations, vs. scientists trying to describe 6-year-olds’ talk, activities of molecules.

Something has occurred, our job is to explain it; vs. (for possible lies, etc.) that possible-fact which has an explanation is the one that occurred.

F ’65

Lecture 3

p. 146

Literary aid lay use of collaborative utterances

Lecture 12

pp. 200-203

Lay use of psychiatric terms

S ’66

Lecture 4

p. 304

First Five Minutes as “lay”-analytic

S ’67

Lecture 9

p. 558

Lay psychology

S ’68

April 17

p. 752

Lay approach to ‘topic’

Volume II

F ‘68

Lecture 1

p. 4


p. 8


p. 15


“Lay observation” Second stories are similar to the prior story


“Anybody could say that”


Lay formulations of time and place


Lecture 2

p. 18


Re: Stories. Technical features of lay characterization


S ‘70

Lecture 1

p. 217


Laymen would not venture an opinion of chemistry or physics, but feel free to make psychological remarks (Freud)


Lecture 6

p. 267


“as a lay matter”, noticing defensiveness.


Lecture 7

p. 269-71


“What’s going on in a lay sense”


S ‘71

April 9

p. 348


“Technical competition in conversation”


Lies, Lying

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 10

p. 79

Lecture 14

pp. 114-115

F ’65

Lecture 9

p. 185

S ’66

Lecture 2

p. 255

Lecture 13

pp. 365-366

Lecture 20

pp. 411, 414

Lecture 26

 

pp. 448-449

S ’67

Lecture 8

p. 556

Lecture 9

pp. 563-565

S ’68

April 24

p. 772

Volume II

S ’71

April 30

p. 380

Suicidal callers to SPC will not give their names, but also will not lie.

May 10

p. 394

Mr. Smith’s bluff called by suicidal caller.

Linguistics

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 4

p. 26ff

 

 

Lecture 12

pp. 95, 99

 

Lecture 13

pp. 107-108, 112

 

 

S ’66

Lecture 23

pp. 428-430

 

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 5

 

Lists, Listing

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 148-149

Lecture 5

p. 159

Lecture 7

p. 169

S ’66

Lecture 27

p. 450-451

Relevance of a list to the hearing of an nth

F ’67

Lecture 12

pp. 726-727

Orientation to a list generates a puzzle

S ’68

May 22

pp. 784-785

Speaking a list

May 29

p. 800

Partitioned items on a list

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 13

X, Y “also”

Lecture 5

p. 65

“And” placed before last item on a list

W ’71

March 4

p. 316

“I don’t want an X, I want a Y or a Z.”

S ’71

May 21

p. 404

A replicated triplet

F ’71

Lecture 9

p. 475

At least and no more than 3 events needed to exhibit the last of them as peculiar

Lecture 14

pp. 500-502

“I don’t want an X, I want a Y or a Z.”

S ’72

Lecture 5

p. 562

p. 565

Lists as “ideal natural objects for getting at some sorts of commonness of meanings.” (re. “How did you survive the quake? And the fires and the floods and everything.”)

Re. a question that contains a list can propose topicality vs. just Q-A.

Literature

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 13

p. 112

F ’65

Lecture 3

pp. 145, 146, 147

S ’66

Lecture 1

p. 242

“Computers could build novels”

Lecture 7

 

p. 322

Masters, Freud, Donald Duck.

S ’68

May 29

p. 791

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 1

p. 216, 217

Lecture 3

pp. 238-239

What Gogol did to Western literature (de-economization)

S ’71

May 21

pp. 404-405

What Virginia Woolf did to the novel (de-identification)

Localizing the World

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 36-38

Private calendars

S ’66

Lecture 28

p. 458-460

Local environment adequate for making comparisons & attributing causes

S ’68

April 24

p. 770

Storyteller making an event (auto wreck) into something in her life.

May 8

p. 780

“We’ll have an unusual experience to talk about” (1st day in concentration camp)

May 29

p. 791

p. 794-795, 798

(“Privatizing the world”)

(“Adequacy of very local environments”)

April 17

pp. 753-754

“Two police cars across the street

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

pp. 13-15

“Goshawful wreck” happened “on the way home

Lecture 2

p. 28

Making an event (auto wreck) into one’s own experience

W ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 92-93

‘Local resources’ for making conversation

Lecture 8

pp. 134-135

“The collection of co-participants defines the population of ‘to whom [an utterance’s action] would be done.”

S ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 215-221

Doing ‘being ordinary’

Lecture 4

pp. 243-248

Entitlement to experiences

Lecture 5

pp. 258-259

Story experience in terms of your place in them

W ’71

February 19

pp. 296-298

Adequacy of local collection of people as compliment / complaint recipients about whatsoever.

F ’71

Lecture 8

pp. 467-468

“People…are built to be the custodians of just about only their own experiences.”

Lecture 11

pp. 483-484

NB data re. RFK assassination: “It would have ruined your whole trip” and kid’s home run “the only good thing that happened to me this week.” (i.e. “it is her life that the assassination has happened to.”)

S ’72

Lecture 3

pp. 548-549

p. 551

Re. making the telephone “at home with the rest of our world.” “Each new object becomes the occasion for seeing again what we can see anywhere; seeing people’s nastinesses or goodnesses and all the rest…”

Re. telephone as source of family conflict

Lecture 5

p. 563

pp. 568-569

Re. ‘disasters’ as a conversational topic: People talk “overwhelmingly…about things insofar as thing happened to them.  Talking about whatever, it comes home to ‘us’.”

Making events into talk by turning them into ‘something for us’.

Logic

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 5

p. 37

Counterfactual conditionals

Lecture 9

pp. 66-67

Suicide possibility as “logical”

Lecture 13

p. 112

And ‘potential descriptions’

F ’65

Lecture 6

p. 164

Transiency of references: indexicals

S ’66

Lecture 8

p. 333

And ‘indexical expressions’

W ’67

February 16

pp. 517-518

And ‘indicator terms’

S ’67

Lecture 11

p. 568

Vis-à-vis ‘contradictory statements’

F ’67

Lecture 8

p. 687

Re. paraphrased quotations of Q-A.

Lecture 9

pp. 696-697

Re. the Stoic paradoxes

Lecture 14

pp. 741-742

Re. “Tuesday” vs. “November 11, 1967.”

Macro / Micro (See also ‘Importance, Interestingness, etc.’)

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 3

Agency’s concern / addressed question

Lecture 2

p. 17

p. 19

‘Structure of society’ / focusing kinds of troubles

“Comparative dynamics of the persons” / “Just examining an interchange”

Lecture 3

pp. 22-23

p. 24

“A larger sense” (murder interrogation) / other matters

Apparent complexity / possible simplicity

Lecture 4

pp. 27-28

Durkheim: macro

Lecture 8

p. 65

[Sacks addresses the terms ‘macro’ / ‘micro’]

F ’65

Lecture 7

p. 170

Institutional vs. Conversational decision

Lecture 8

p. 178

Sacred vs. mundane

S ’66

Lecture 1

pp. 237-238

“Fine power of a culture”

Lecture 1 (R)

pp. 245-245

“Fine power of a culture”

Lecture 33

pp. 483-486

Overview

F ’67

Lecture 14

p. 742

Relevancies of a detail (“Tuesday” vs. “November 11, 1967”) are so powerful and so extensive…“Not just stopping at the red light, but preceding properly with each detail.”

S ’68

May 8

p. 783

2nd stories can be “gigantically consequential”

May 29

p. 795

“Your friends are just as good to thank as the gods.”

Meaning

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 13

p. 112

F ’65

Lecture 12

pp. 200-201

Measurement

Volume I

F ’64 -

S ’65

Lecture 8

pp. 57-62

S ’66

Lecture 24

pp. 435-440

F ’67

Lecture 14

pp. 742-743

Approximate vs. precise numbers

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 2

p. 183

Approximate vs. precise time reference

S ’70

Lecture 3

pp. 235-236

“Usualness” measures vs. “more precise” characterizations [cf. F ’68 Lecture 6 p. 78, ‘member talk’: “asserting a variable without stating its value”] Here, to do with “competence”.

Membership Categorization Device: (See ‘Categories & Classes’)

Volume I

Volume II

Memory

Volume I

S ’68

April 17

pp. 759-760

p. 761

Place and memory

Memory touched off by a word

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

pp. 4-8

Memory search for 2nd story

Lecture 2

pp. 21-24

pp. 27-28

“I remember” proposes ‘topical coherence’

Remembering “in conversation terms”, amnesia

S ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 257-260

Memory & 2nd story; storing information, etc.

W ’71

February 19

p. 299

Memory can be trusted to store & release items into conversation

S ’71

April 12

p. 356

“Relative amnesia for specifically last topic”

May 17

p. 399

pp. 400-401

Spatializing techniques and memory

Memory & mind control

F ’71

Lecture 7

pp. 462-463

Memory for ‘famous ex-relationals’ [‘X-relationals’ ed.]

Lecture 16

pp. 512-514

Remembering a dream vs. remembering a real event

Minority Groups

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 6

pp. 42-48

Lecture 9

pp. 68, 70

Lecture 10

p. 74

Lecture 11

p. 82

F ’65

Lecture 5

p. 160

Lecture 7

pp. 171-174

Lecture 10

p. 191

S ’66

Lecture 8

pp. 336-340

Lecture 18

pp. 396-403

Lecture 26

pp. 446-449

Lecture 28

pp. 458-459

Lecture 32

pp. 479-480

S ’67

Lecture 11

p. 577

Lecture 12

pp. 582

Lecture 13

p. 586

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 7

pp. 118-123

W ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 180-181

pp. 185-187

Lecture 4

pp. 198-199

S ’70

Lecture 8

pp. 282-284

F ’71

Lecture 7

p. 459 (data)

“Kirk Douglas is Jewish too”

S ’72

Lecture 2

pp. 538, 539

“Unique position”: the oldest in the class, by far; the only black, woman, cop in the class, etc. “How do you get along with…all those others who are younger, white, male, etc.”

M.I.R. Device

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 6

pp. 40-48

Lecture 9

pp. 68-69

Moves (See also Turn-taking, Sequence)

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 6-7

Skipping a move

Lecture 12

p. 96

Proper ‘move’: a greeting after a greeting

F ’65

Lecture 5

p. 160

Lecture 9

p. 184

Lecture 10

p. 190

Volume II

F ’65

Lecture 5

p. 160

Lecture 9

pp. 21-24

pp. 27-28

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 159, 162

Greeting sequence by analogy to a chess game

Names, No-Naming, etc.

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

pp. 284-285

pp. 289-290

No-naming

Names as insufficient identification

Lecture 20

pp. 414-416

Names as “disguised descriptions”

F ’67

Lecture 12

p. 724

Names: predictably wrongly transcribed

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 5

pp. 61-62

pp. 63-64

No-naming

Name-types in introductions

Lecture 6

pp. 68-69

Name-types in introductions

W ’69

Lecture 7

p. 115

pp. 117-118

Motor → engine → “thing” (no-naming)

“Thunderbird” vs. “Ford” / a car named Voodoo vs. “I call my TV Charlie”

Lecture 9

pp. 146-149

Place names

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 160, 162

p. 161

Caller does “[Name]?” to get to 1st topic

Name types in phone call openings

Lecture 5

pp. 203, 204

Caller does “[Name]?” to get to 1st topic

S ’71

April 30

pp. 377-380

SPC caller not giving her name

News

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

pp. 11-16

“Goshawful accident” as candidate ‘local news’

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 172-173

What happened at Bullocks today as ‘potential news’

S ’70

Lecture 3

pp. 230-231, 238

“Goshawful accident” as possible local news

S ’72

Lecture 5

pp. 563-564

Non-local character of events that are ‘news’. Turning a disaster into “something for us.”

Lecture 6

pp. 572-574

Announcements of “big news” followed by “expression of surprise” by recipient.

Normal, Standard, Routine, Normative, etc.

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 9-10

 

pp. 9-10

 

“May I help you” as ‘standardized utterance

 

Routine treatment

Lecture 2

p. 19

 

“Normal answer to [X] is [Y].”

Lecture 3

p. 22

 

“Routinely used” device

Lecture 8

pp. 58-59

 

p. 62

 

‘Normal’ as a ‘standardized category

 

‘Normal events’ vs. ‘odd events’.

Lecture 11

pp. 88-89

 

p. 93

 

‘Average’

 

“Routinely the case that persons know what others are thinking.”

Lecture 12

p. 96

 

p. 103

 

‘Greeting’ as ‘standardized’ ACU

 

Standardized’ objects to start conversation

 

F ’65

Lecture 11

p. 195

 

“A routine argument: if you do X, Y is bound to happen”

 

S ‘66

Lecture 5

pp. 310-311

‘normative pause’

 

F ’67

 

Lecture 4

p. 649

 

‘The sentence as a normative production’

Lecture 9

pp. 699-700

 

 

Extraordinary statements (e.g. in GTS, Ken’s paradox) as otherwise routine (also, see Puns)

Lecture 14

p. 740

Routine, mundane matters

 

 

S ’68

April 24

p. 767

 

 

p. 771

 

p. 772

 

Story-characterizing adjectives as “normative phenomena between groups.”

 

“Normative status” of the search technique for a 2nd story.

 

Pacing rules as “powerful normative techniques”.

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 50

 

Turn-taking rules as ‘normative’

Lecture 6

p. 67

 

Introductions as ‘normative’

 

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 159

 

 

p. 159

 

p. 170

 

Greeting sequences “characteristically”, “generally” 6 or 7 utterances long.

 

“Utterly normative first move”: ‘Hello’ “essentially universal”

 

‘Reason-for-call’ status “…seems to have normative classificatory importance”

 

 

S ’70

Lecture 3

p. 230

p. 235

 

“…it is utterly routine for stories, that tellers [recipient-design them]…”

‘Usualness or normalness measures” [of ‘member talk’: asserting a variable without stating its value (e.g. “It’s a 1950!”) Volume II p. 78

F ’68 Lecture 6.]

 

 

F ’71

Lecture 1

p. 419

 

Re. limitations of proving hypothetical data as “typical”

Lecture 6

p. 455

 

 

p. 457

 

As part of a story, teller indicates that the sex occurred at its “normal” temporal position for a date.

 

Commitment to the “normal preferences”

Lecture 9

p. 476

 

Re. “the normal form for talk “across a series of reported utterances”

Norms

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 10

p. 77

 

 

Lecture 11

p. 93

 

 

 

F ’65

Lecture 10

p. 190

 

 

Lecture 14

p. 206

 

 

 

S ’66

 

Lecture 2

pp. 253-254

 

 

Lecture 2 (R)

p. 260

 

 

Lecture 18

p. 399

 

 

 

W ’67

March 9

p. 545

To ‘direct reference’ the “norm”?

 

 

F ’67

Lecture 2

p. 634

 

 

Lecture 4

p. 649

 

The sentence as a ‘normative production’

Lecture 14

p. 740

 

A ‘normative feature’ of paraphrases

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 2

p. 21

 

“There’s’ a major sort of norm against repeating the same thing to the same persons.”

 

Obligation (See ‘Rights and Obligations’)

Volume I

Volume II

Observability / Observables, etc. (See also Recognizablity)

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 4

pp. 28, 31

Lecture 8

p. 58

‘Noticeable’ events

Lecture 11

p. 88

pp. 90-91

Of such units as ‘a family’

Lecture 13

p. 107

‘Noticeable’ events

Lecture 14

pp. 119-121

For Members, activities are observables

F ’65

Lecture 10

pp. 190, 191

S ’66

Lecture 04.a

p. 283

p. 287

An observably orderly sequence

Observability of a ‘second’ activity

Lecture 04.b

p. 293-295

Observable absences

Lecture 12

pp. 363-368

Observable thoughts (Button-Button)

Appendix A

p. 493

p. 506

Observable game events

Observable errors

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 4

Observable-to-coparticipant similarity of 2nd story to 1st

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 174

Relevance of a ‘crowd watching’ to observability of an event

Lecture 2

pp. 185-187

“Differential organization of the sheer perceiving of an event” (Estelle & Bullocks)

Lecture 4

pp. 194-195

Relevance of ‘crowd’ to observability of an event

S ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 215-221

Achieving the observed ordinariness of events

S ’72

Lecture 2

p. 539

That one is the oldest in the class “by far” is ‘glance-determinable’.

Offers

Volume II

W ’71

March 11

pp. 318-331

A re-offer sequence (‘herring’)

“On the Way Home” = ‘The Story is about to Come’

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 3

p. 232

Opinion

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 5

p. 33

Overall Structural Organization

Volume I

S ’66

 

p. 309

Pacing

Volume I

S ’68

 

April 24

pp. 771-772

 

 

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 2

pp. 27-28

 

Remembering in “conversation time”

 

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 166, 168

 

Solving a problem “within utterance time”

 

S ’70

Lecture 5

pp. 257, 259

 

Remembering in “conversation time”

Lecture 6

pp. 266-267

 

Producing a solution to a posed problem “on the spur of the moment”

 

S ’71

April 5

p. 341

 

pp. 346-347

 

Selecting words “within conversation time”

 

Finding ‘best possible attack’ in ‘no time’

May 21

pp. 410-411

 

“Uh huh” vis-à-vis no gap no overlap, within 1/10 second

 

F ’71

Lecture 2

pp. 428-429

 

Producing an understanding of a story “right now”… “which happens to be 2 seconds in this case.” (GTS “roof” (ceiling) / “something to look up to”)

 

Pairing Off

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 8

pp. 127, 128, 129-133

 

No Nancy (NB data) & Deep South (ethnography)

Pairs

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

 

Lecture 1

p. 4

 

Greetings

Lecture 2

p. 14

 

“How are you?” “Fine”

Lecture 6

pp. 47-48

 

Two-set classes

Lecture 12

pp. 96, 101

 

Greetings

 

S ’66

Lecture 2

p. 254

 

p. 256

 

Pairs of actions related by norms

 

Questions get answers

Lecture 2(R)

p. 260

 

p. 264

 

Pairs of action related by norms

 

Questions get answers

Lecture 5

p. 308-311

 

Greetings; Q-A

Lecture 7

pp. 323-325

 

pp. 326-327

 

Paired utterances; ‘interruption’; ‘Long vs. Short Control’

 

Relational pair categories

Lecture 11

p. 351

 

Insult-Retort

Lecture 14

pp. 372-374

 

1st and 2nd pair-members

Lecture 16

p. 383

 

“My” vis-à-vis Relational Pairs

Lecture 21

pp. 419-420

 

Insult-Retort, Q-A, Commands-Returns

Lecture 26

p. 445

 

Paired categories

 

W ’67

March 2

p. 528

 

Questions as “sequentially relevant” - get answers

 

F ’67

Lecture 6

pp. 667-674

 

Various

Lecture 7

pp. 675-676

 

The “unit character” of utterance pairs

Lecture 8

p. 685

 

‘Expansions’ on pair sequences: pre-sequences

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 189-190

 

“Greetings come in pairs”

 

S ’72

Lecture 1

pp. 521--532

 

Adjacency pairs

Lecture 2

pp. 533-537

 

Adjacency pairs

Lecture 5

p. 565

 

Pair vs. topical organization

Paradox

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 5

p. 162

 

“I decided that years ago”

 

S ’66

Lecture 19

pp. 404-405

 

“I talk in my sleep”

Lecture 21

pp. 422-424

 

“I decided that years ago”

 

F ’67

Lecture 9

pp. 693-699

 

“I decided that years ago”

Paranoia

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 1

p. 19

 

 

Lecture 5

p. 35

 

 

 

S ’66

Lecture 12

p. 356

 

 

Paraphrasing

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

 

Lecture 13

p. 109

 

Poems and proverbs lose power when paraphrased

 

F ’67

Lecture 8

Lecture 14

p. 687

 

p. 739

 

pp. 739-740

 

Paraphrased quotation of (combined) Q-A is appropriate version of what answerer said

 

“His mommy…told him to get out of the road.”

 

Q-A paraphrased as answerer’s ‘statement’

 

Volume II

W ’69

 

Lecture 3

pp. 112-113

 

Academic notion of showing understanding is to paraphrase

Pause (See: ‘Silence / Pause’)

Volume I

Volume II

Performatives

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 10

pp. 343-344

 

Lecture 19

p. 404

S ’67

Lecture 17

pp. 613-615

 

F ’67

Lecture 13

pp. 737=738

 

Philosophy

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 3

p. 24

 

F ’65

Lecture 11

p. 195

 

Lecture 12

p. 202

 

S ’66

Lecture 14

p. 371

 

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 5

 

‘Phoney’

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 9

pp. 69-70

 

S ’66

Lecture 08

pp. 329-330

 

S ’67

Lecture 12

pp. 580-581

 

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 6

pp. 79-80

 

Placement, Positioning

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

 

Lecture 1

p. 6

 

“I can’t hear you” usable anywhere

Lecture 3

p. 31

 

Mid-conversation occurrence or not?

 

F ’65

Lecture 9

p. 183

 

Positioning freedom of clausal constructions

Lecture 04.b

pp. 296-299

Priority Activities

 

 

S ’66

Lecture 5

p. 309

 

“By the way”: position marker

Lecture 10

pp. 344-346

 

pp. 346-347

 

“I still say though…”

 

Positioned categories

Lecture 17

p. 408

 

Positioning freedom of clausal constructions

 

W ’67

March 9

pp. 538, 542

 

p. 543

 

Positioned topic introduction

 

“Too” as a speaker-positioning marker

 

S ’67

Lecture 17

p. 614

 

“I still say though…”

 

F ’67

Lecture 2

pp. 633, 634-635

 

Various

Lecture 3

p. 642

 

“Interruptions”

Lecture 4

p. 650

 

Next utterance at completion

Lecture 5

pp. 661-662

 

Appendor Questions

Lecture 7

pp. 681-682

 

Floor seekers

Lecture 13

p. 733ff

 

Mis-hearings

Lecture 14

pp. 745-746

 

Laughter & “Uh huh”

 

S ’68

May 8

p. 775

 

p. 777

 

Announcement of reason for a call often placed at beginning of call

 

‘Timing’ of a call (e.g. 4:00am)

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 47

 

Placement and “adjacency relationship”

 

W ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 87-91

 

Placement of noticings, announcements, etc.

 

W ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 188-189

 

p. 199

 

Placement of ‘greetings’

 

Emotions placed in phone call openings

 

S ’70

Lecture 4

pp. 247-248

 

Placement of stories in a conversation; in time…vis-à-vis story’s importance

 

Lecture 5

p. 254

 

“I still say though”

Lecture 7

pp. 273-274

 

Adjacent vs. distanced relevant utterances

 

W ’71

March 11

p. 320

 

Placement of noticings

 

S ’71

April 9

pp. 352-353

 

“Speaker specifically place almost all of their utterances.”

April 12

pp. 357-358

 

Placed utterances

April 17

p. 364

 

Placing ‘closings’

May 10

pp. 393-394

 

Call to SPC placed in the course-of emotional trouble

May 21

p. 403

 

Positioning of closings

 

F ’71

Lecture 1

pp. 422-423

 

Story recipients place an understanding upon completion of a story.  Proverbial expressions used to understand with.  So, proverbial expressions commonly occur in story completions.

 

Lecture 2

p. 425

 

p. 427

 

A place for putting ‘understandings’ is directly on completion of a story

 

An utterance’s positioning can be a resource for finding what it’s talking to.

 

Lecture 6

p. 455

 

Assertion of “normal [temporal] positioning of sex for a date.”

Lecture 9

p. 473

 

“Next morning” vis-à-vis “last night”, “second door” vis-à-vis “first door”

 

 

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 530

 

Positioning an utterance vis-à-vis adjacency pairs (incl. “I did, too”)

Lecture 2

pp. 538, 539-540

 

“The oldest one in the class” as a “unique position”, like “the only cop/ Negro / woman in the class”

 

Lecture 4

pp. 554-560

 

pp. 557-558

 

‘Next position’

 

“I still say though”

Lecture 5

pp. 567-568

 

“Anyway”

Lecture 6

pp. 572-574

 

 

pp. 574-575

 

p. 575

 

Placement of expressions of sorrow and joy (“very very early on into the conversation”)

 

Placement of interactionally generated invitations after a ‘thankable’

 

“Positioning load” of an utterance; e.g. “Anyway”

Playing Dumb, Feigning Innocence, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

 

Lecture 11

p. 83

 

 

 

F ’65

Lecture 6

p. 163

 

 

 

S ’66

Lecture 15

pp. 379-380

 

 

‘Poetics’ of Ordinary Talk

Volume I

F ’65

Lecture 9

pp. 186-187

 

Double adjectives: e.g. “Dirty grubby”, “teeny weeny”

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 5

p. 264

 

p. 265

 

‘Vision’ conceptions for blind lady’s problem

 

Sound relationship ‘preoccupied’ (‘ocular’)

 

W ’71

February 19

pp. 291-293

 

“God → soul → only one” / “Oh God → gotten” semantic and sound relationships

 

March 4

pp. 305-309

 

pp. 314-315

 

“Sound sequences”

 

‘Latching on’

March 11

pp. 321-325

 

Various

 

S ’71

April 5

pp. 341-344

 

Sound / contrast

May 17

pp. 396-401

 

Spatialized characterizations

 

F ’71

Lecture 1

pp. 420-424

Pun: “Something to look up to” (vis-à-vis “roof”)

Lecture 2

pp. 425-428

 

Pun: “Something to look up to” (vis-à-vis “roof”)

Lecture 3

pp. 431-435

 

pp. 435-436

 

Allusive talk / punning “skirting the subject”, the subject being sex

 

Flurry of visual terms

Lecture 15

p. 505

 

“We SPENT…” Here used for ‘time’, where money is an unmentioned, complainable expenditure “He GAVE no…” Here used for a ‘reason’, where gifts is a ungiven giveable.

 

Poetry

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 13

pp. 108-109

F ’65

Lecture 6

p. 165

S ’66

Lecture 20

p. 414

 

F ’67

Introduction

p. 621

 

Lecture 4

pp. 650-651

Lecture 5

p. 664

S ’68

April 17

pp. 755-756

 

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 216, 217

 

Politeness

Volume I

F ’67

Lecture 10

p. 705

 

Volume II

Possessables and Possessitives

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 16

pp. 383-387

 

S ’67

Lecture 16

pp. 605-609

 

Volume II

Power

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’66

Lecture 8

p. 59

“Power is a zero-sum phenomenon”

Volume II

Practical Mysticism

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 9

pp. 147-148

 

Pre-sequences

Volume I

S ’66

 

Lecture 4

pp. 302-305

 

Pre-invitations / rejections (1st speaker)

 

F ’67

Lecture 7

pp. 685-691

 

Various

 

S ’68

April 24

pp. 765-766

 

Story ‘pre-beginnings’

May 8

p. 773

 

Pre-acceptance or rejection (asking for a reason for a call)

Volume II

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 529

 

“Pre-signalling” e.g., invitations

Preference

Volume I

S ’66

 

Lecture 8

p. 337

 

A “preferred category” for identifying someone

Lecture 13

p. 367

 

[X] “is not a matter of theoretical preference for the players”

 

W ’67

March 9

p. 540

 

A specific conversational “move” is “not legitimate, conventional, preferred, etc.

 

 

F ’67

Lecture 12

p. 725

 

Re. obscene puns: “on the one hand, routinely one hearing is so preferred that the other is not even considered or heard, and on the other,… in special circumstances the usual preferred hearing is rejected.”

 

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

pp. 96-97

 

 

p. 97

 

Local explanations, for whatever, are preferred explanations, if they can be used.”

 

Preference for “local expenses”

Lecture 8

p. 133

 

Preference for “concrete conversation”?

Lecture 9

p. 144

 

pp. 147-149

 

Preference for ‘if-then’ multi-clause sentences over clause + ‘and’, ‘but’, etc.

Preference for description that the other knows

 

W ’70

Lecture 5

p. 207

 

Preference for offers over requests

 

S ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 223-224

 

Preference for current selects next, over next self-selects

 

S ’71

April 23

pp. 367-368

 

‘First preference invitations’: “If the invitation is not for the first preference, then you’re indicating that a first preference is not present.” (‘dinner' vs. e.g. ‘talk’)

 

April 26

p. 374

 

“ ‘Talk’ as a non-preferred event replaceable with some preferred event, ‘get drunk’.  Preferred characterizations of Saturday evening.”

 

May 21

p. 409

 

Preference for going second

May 24

p. 413

 

pp. 414-415

 

‘Not hearing’ “preferably said” over ‘not understanding’

 

‘Questioner-preferred answers’

 

F ’71

Lecture 5

pp. 444-452

 

p. 456

 

Preference for Type I over Type II identifications

 

Abstract sense of ‘preference’: as a first alternative. (Louise's sex story)

Lecture 13

p. 496

 

Current speaker selects next as “preferred”

 

S ’72

Lecture 1

p. 524

 

“Ordering of preferences” vis-à-vis next speaker selection

Lecture 5

pp. 565-566

 

 

pp. 566-567

 

A question can “prefer something an answer long or more than an answer long (the letter being e.g., “a ‘topic opener’”.)

 

“…A preference for…using aspects of the [conversation’s opening] to get directly into topic talk…”

 

Lecture 6

p. 572

 

Expressions of sorrow and joy related “preferentially” to each other: sorrow first or only

 

Preservable Features of an Interaction for Another Interaction

Volume I

S ’68

May 8

p. 773

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 4

p. 49

Complaints

 

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 165

“The first thing he said was…”

 

S ’70

Lecture 8

p. 283

A question asked / answered in a news interview, quoted on a TV show, quoted by a TV-viewer to his friends

 

F ’71

Lecture 7

pp. 458-465

ADATO Insurance salesman story: retold after a long delay

Lecture 8

pp. 466-469

(ditto)

Private Calendars

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 5

pp. 36-38

Volume II

W ’70

Lecture 1

p. 167

 

S ’72

Lecture 5

pp. 564-565

Public disasters as “calendrical” vis-à-vis ‘the last time we talked’

Programmatic Relevance

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 5

p. 39

Volume II

S ’66

Lecture 8

pp. 336-340

Of knowledge formulated via MCD categories

Appendix A

pp. 493-495

In children’s games

 

S ’67

Lecture 12

p. 578

Of categorical, ‘Y do X’ statements

Lecture 13

p. 588

Kids learn it early

Pronouns (See ‘Indexical Expressions’)

Volume I

Volume II

Proverbs

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 3

p. 24

Lecture 8

p. 62

And ‘normal events’

Lecture 10

p. 78

And kids’ case-by case Class I, II inquiries

Lecture 13

pp. 104-110

F ’65

Lecture 6

pp. 166, 167

‘Proverbially correct’

S ’67

Lecture 13

pp. 587-588

Tautological proverbs

Volume II

F ’71

Lecture 1

pp. 422-424

Used to show understanding

Lecture 2

pp. 426-430

“Ideal objects to do ‘understanding’ with”

Psychiatric Issues, Materials, etc.

Volume I

F ’64 –

S ’65

Lecture 1

 

 

 

Lecture 2

p. 3

 

p. 10

 

p. 19

 

Lecture 4

p. 28

 

p. 29

 

Lecture 5

p. 33

p. 35

 

Lecture 6

pp. 46-47

 

Lecture 8

p. 60

 

Lecture 10

pp. 76-80

 

Lecture 11

p. 93

 

Lecture 13

pp. 109-110

 

Lecture 14

p. 113ff

 

 

F ’65

Lecture 12

pp. 199-203

 

Lecture 14

p. 214

 

 

S ’66

Lecture 4

pp. 302-304

 

Lecture 7

pp. 324-325

 

Lecture 10

p. 347

 

Lecture 12

pp. 354-356

 

Lecture 13

pp. 364-365

 

Lecture 18

p. 398

 

pp. 400-401

 

Lecture 19

p. 406

 

Lecture 20

p. 411

 

p. 413

 

Lecture 23

p. 433

 

Lecture 27

pp. 452-454

 

Lecture 28

p. 459

 

 

F ’67

Lecture 14

p. 742

 

 

S ’68

April 24

p. 768

 

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 2

p. 28

 

 

W ’69

Lecture 3

pp. 105-106

 

Lecture 8

pp. 135-136

 

 

S ’70

Lecture 1

p. 217

 

Lecture 5

pp. 259-260

 

 

W ’71

March 4

p. 312

 

 

S ’71

April 30

pp. 376-383

SPC: NYE

May 3

pp. 384-390

SPC: NYE

May 10

pp. 391-395

SPC: NYE

May 17

pp. 396-401

SPC: NYE

May 21

pp. 402-409

SPC: NYE

 

F ’71

Lecture 2

p. 426

 

Lecture 16

p. 514

 

Puns

Volume I

S ’66

Lecture 27

p. 451

F ’67

Lecture 9

pp. 699-700

(As emerging from “routine” productions)

Lecture 12

p. 725

Obscene puns

Questions, Answers, Q-A

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 1

pp. 4, 8

 

 

Lecture 4

p. 29

 

 

Lecture 5

p. 32

 

 

Lecture 6

p. 40

 

 

Lecture 7

pp. 49-56

 

pp. 49, 51-52

 

p. 56

 

 

 

‘Chaining rule’ (not by that name)

 

Answer constructed re. project of questions (cf. p. 688)

Lecture 12

p. 96

 

p. 102

 

p. 103

 

 

 

‘The ‘chain’ possibility”

 

F ’65

Lecture 3

p. 144

 

The 10 ‘initiation ceremony’ “questions”

Lecture 4

p. 156

 

 

Lecture 5

p. 158

 

 

Lecture 8

pp. 176-177

 

 

Lecture 14

pp. 211-212, 217-219

 

 

Appendix B

p. 231

 

“What are you doing?” “Nothing”

 

S ’66

 

Lecture 2

p. 256

 

pp. 256-257

 

Qs get As; “‘the chaining rule’.”

 

“You know what?” “What?”

Lecture 2 (R)

p. 264

 

Qs get As; “‘the chaining rule’.”

Lecture 04.a

p. 264

 

Non-Q-intend recognizable Qs

Lecture 5

pp. 309-311

 

 

Lecture 7

p. 324

 

Q-Q-A-A (cf. p. 55)

Lecture 11

p. 350

 

Answers with “built-in defenses”

Lecture 14

pp. 373-374

 

p. 373

 

As 1st and 2nd pair-members

 

Re. Q-intonations [“What’s my Line” data]

Lecture 15

pp. 380-381

 

Correction-invitation device (“No” + a 'good' reason)

Lecture 27

p. 453

 

Questions which give information about askers

 

S ’67

Lecture 9

pp. 564-565

 

Lying answers to which-type questions

 

F ’67

Introduction

pp. 619-621

 

“What are you going to do?”

Lecture 5

pp. 659-664

 

Appendor questions

Lecture 6

pp. 667-674

 

(As ‘paired utterances’)

Lecture 8

p. 687

 

p. 688

 

Paraphrased quotations of Q-A as statements

 

Answers directed to the sequence of which the question is seen to be a part (cf. p. 56)

 

Lecture 9

p. 696

 

“What use would it have?” (none)

Lecture 14

pp. 740-743

 

In the fit between Qs and As

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 2

p. 25

 

‘Answers’: 2nds; non-sentences

Lecture 4

p. 47

 

Placement of possible answer of the question

 

W ’69

Lecture 7

pp. 124-125

 

Answer / Comment-as-Answer relationship vis-à-vis Q-Q-Q etc. “Why?” “Why not?” “What do you mean ‘why not’?”

 

W ’70

Lecture 2

pp. 176-178

 

A question which conveys information requires only a “yes/no” answer to the question, no response to the conveyed information

 

 

S ’70

Lecture 8

pp. 282-284

 

On asking questions

 

S ’71

April 5

pp. 344-346

 

Q-q-a-A; strategies for avoiding going 1st

April 30

pp. 380-383

 

‘Face sheet’ questions

May 24

pp. 412-415

 

“Yes” vs. “No”- plus or “Yes but”

 

F ’71

Lecture 2

p. 427

 

“Yes” / “No” answer vis-à-vis positioning and understanding

 

S ’72

Lecture 1

pp. 528, 529

 

p. 530

 

Q [q-a] A: “insertion sequences”

 

Grammatical non-sentence as adequate complete 2nd pair parts, e.g. Answers

 

Lecture 2

p. 535

 

 

pp. 537-539

 

Repeated Q’s “do not follow a 1st pair part, they follow the pause after a 1st pair part.”

 

Q-A: “Are you the oldest one in the class?”  “Oh, by far.”

Lecture 3

pp. 547-548

 

To the Q “Who is calling?” there are alternative types of answers

Lecture 4

p. 559

 

One-word questions (e.g. “Why?”) and ‘appendor questions’ (e.g. “Until when?”)

 

Lecture 5

pp. 561-569

 

Q-A: “How did you survive…?” (as a “How have you been?”)

Reason-for-a-Call

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 10

pp. 73-74

Calls as ‘accountable actions’ vs. “No reason”

 

S ’68

May 8

pp. 773-779

 

May 29

p. 793

 

Volume II

W ’69

Lecture 1

p. 88

 

 

W ’70

Lecture 1

pp. 163-166

pp. 169-171

 

Lecture 5

p. 210

 

 

F ’71

Lecture 4

p. 440

 

Recasting a Prior Action

Volume I

F ’64-

S ’65

Lecture 2

p. 20

Volume II

S ’70

Lecture 8

pp. 286-287

Recipient Design

Volume I

S ’68

April 24

p. 765

 

‘Orienting to a co-participant’ vs. e.g. to an audience

May 29

pp. 790-791

 

Stories ‘worked up’ for current interactions

Volume II

F ’68

Lecture 1

p. 7

 

2nd story selection procedure as “interactionally relevant”

 

S ’70

Lecture 3

pp. 229-230

 

“Goshawful wreck” story preface as “designed for the recipient”

Lecture 7

pp. 274-276

 

Re. bit of contexting information (“his wife that died’s name’s Ellen,” etc.)

 

 

S ’71

May 3

pp. 385-390

 

SPC:NYE Various techniques for forcing coparticipant to recipient design his talk

 

May 21

pp. 404-405

 

A characterization for a listener

 

F ’71

Lecture 4

pp. 438-443

 

Spouse problems and solutions to a specification: don’t tell someone what you’ve already told them

 

Lecture 5

pp. 445-450

Selecting identifications by reference to recipient

Lecture 6

pp. 453-457

 

‘Defensive design’ by reference to recipient

Lecture 9

pp. 474-475

 

‘Guiding’ a recipient

Lecture 10

pp. 479-481

 

‘Guiding’ a recipient

 

S ’72

Lecture 2

pp. 540-541

 

Characterizing something by reference to coparticipant’s possible interest in it

 

Lecture 5

p. 564

 

‘Orientation to co-participant’

Recognizability (see also Observability)

Volume I

F ’65

Appendix A

p. 226

A culture is an apparatus for generating recognizable actions.”

S ’66

Lecture 1

pp. 236-237

“…generating…a recognizable action…”

Lecture 1 (R)

pp. 243-245

“Recognizing a description”

Lecture 2 (R)

pp. 260-261

Recognizable ‘possible correct observations’

Lecture 04.a

pp. 287-288

Recognizable Questions

Lecture 14

pp. 373-374

Recognizable Questions