“The lung, from the disease you know”, Epistemic Asymmetry from a Chemotherapy Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Case Study

By Maha Alayyash, Assistant Professor, English Department, Jeddah University

The Saudi society is based on strong family ties rather than patient autonomy (Aljubran, 2010). Therefore, the disclosure of cancer diagnosis is still related to the misconception of incurability (Khalil, 2013). To facilitate the misconception of cancer as a life-threatening illness, physicians tend to disclose cancer diagnosis to chaperones and conceal from, or even modify the unfavourable information given to the patients. Some patients have no right to know the reality of their illness nor to report on their illness. In short, epistemic asymmetry is conceptualised here as violating knowledge norms including the patient’s epistemic primacy (i.e. right to know) (Heritage, 2013). Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the epistemic resources that are used by the oncologist and chaperone to share epistemic access regarding the patient’s illness. Thus, this study attempts to answer the following research question:

How do the oncologist and the chaperone share epistemic access regarding the patient’s illness without involving the patient?

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Embodying resistance and disaffiliation in healthcare interactions

By Dr Daniela Andrade, associate professor at Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos

CA-based research (e.g., Bergen et al., 2017, Koenig, 2011, Stivers, 2006, Street et al., 2005) has demonstrated how patients use the interactional machinery to resist healthcare providers’ recommendations (i.e., deontic actions, determining how the world should be, Stevanovic, 2011). Those might comprise medication, lifestyle, or health conditions monitoring. A recent study (Ostermann, in progress) shows that patients’ reluctance to accept healthcare-providers’ recommendations resides in a continuum between passive resistance and outright rejections.However, research on patient acceptance and resistance in this context has mostly concentrated on verbal actions – including the absence of verbal responses. Patients’ embodied responses to healthcare-providers recommendations received much less attention. Adopting a multimodal interactional approach that seeks to scrutinize visible conducts (Hepburn, Bolden, 2017) in this context may illuminate how the “complex organization of multimodal Gestalts” (Mondada, 2014a) materializes on the unfolding sequences of interest.

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SPAC Data Session Report

By Verónica González Temer, UMCE; and Katherina Walper Gormáz, UACh.

The Permanent Seminar for Conversation Analysis (SPAC for its acronym in Spanish) was born in the middle of 2020 from the need to establish a community that brings together academics interested in working with Spanish interactions from a CA perspective. As part of their activities, they hold regular data sessions run entirely in Spanish.

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Evaluating a conference of firsts: ECCA 2020

By Marije van Braak on behalf of the ECCA 2020 Organizing Committee

There is always a first time for everything – and, well, ECCA 2020 surely was a conference of first times in many respects. A first European Conference of Conversation Analysis, a first junior CA-conference, and one of the first online EMCA-conferences. It was also a conference of firsts in terms of new connections, sharing of initial analyses, prerecorded presentations, password protected data, game time, asynchronized birthday singing… and much more.

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The Multimodal Accomplishment of Body Control in a Cognitive Laboratory

By Nils Klowait and Maria Erofeeva.

The embodied turn in Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis (EMCA) (Goodwin, 2000; Mondada, 2016; Nevile, 2015) in many ways coincided with the material turn: with a greater focus on the interactional ecology came a renewed interest in the role taken by the material environment (Nevile, Haddington, Heinemann, & Rauniomaa, 2014). The way non-human entities may come into play during human interaction currently evolves in multiple branches, some of which are further or closer to the general concerns of EMCA. Put on an ontological gradient, objects may play the role of context, props, resource spaces, parts of the public substrate (Goodwin, 2018), sets of discrete affordances (Hutchby, 2001) and, finally, as autonomous interactants (Cooren, 2004; Latour, 1996).

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Remote Data Sessions Report

Over the past few weeks we’ve all been forced to move our research meetings online in an effort to progress our research, stay connected and have a semblance of what was normal. Holding data sessions remotely is not new — for the past 3 years we have been running the Remote Data Sessions (RDS) series to provide a space for people that may not have access to regular data sessions, or a CA community to practice doing CA and connect with others in the community. This report compiles our thoughts on the most accessible and data session friendly platform, how to access that platform through ISCA, our own procedures for hosting a remote data session (which are applicable for other platforms), and finally we invite discussion and comments on your own ways of remotely working.

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Members Forum Newsletter #1 Jan 2020

This ISCA member forum newsletter is part of a broader goal of ISCA to do more outreach to the EM/CA community by providing regular updates, providing members the opportunity to share their work and ideas, and to invite discussions on methodological developments and emerging theories. In this way we hope to cross borders both in the literal and metaphorical sense, by bringing together researchers from across the globe and making ISCA a truly international society.

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